20 Vintage Photos of Young Jackie Chan in His Early Kung Ku Movies

Jackie Chan played a fair few small roles and did a lot of stunts in movies before taking the lead in some of the films listed further down. He had a minuscule part in Come Drink with Me at the age of 16 and even the highly regarded A Touch of Zen (among other films), before doing stunts in Bruce Lee’s films Fist of Furyand Enter the Dragon. Jackie is a big Bruce Lee fan and did a lot of uncredited work in films during those years of his fame – in movies like Hapkido.

But it was after the death of Bruce Lee that Jackie was being given the opportunity to take on bigger roles. Although it was mainly because the big wigs wanted him to become the next Bruce Lee, they put him in films like The New Fist of Fury, a sequel to the original Bruce Lee’s film.

Of course he eventually broke through into the Kung Fu comedy scene with Snake in the Eagles Shadow and Drunken Master and became the legendary actor everyone knows today.




















26 Wild Photos of New Yorks Notorious Studio 54 Disco Club

Studio 54 is a former nightclub and currently a Broadway theatre, located at 254 West 54th Street, between Eighth Avenue and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, originally built as the Gallo Opera House, opened in 1927, after which it changed names several times, eventually becoming CBS radio and television Studio 52.

In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.The nightclub founders spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on professional lighting design and kept many of the former TV and theatrical sets, in the process creating a unique dance club that became famous for its celebrity guest lists, restrictive (and subjective) entry policies (based on one’s appearance and style), and open club drug use. Founded and created by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager in 1977, it was sold in 1980 to Mark Fleischman,[7][8][9] who reopened the club after it had been shut down following the conviction of Rubell and Schrager on charges of tax evasion. In 1984, Fleischman sold the club, which continued to operate until 1986.

Since November 1998, it has served as a venue for productions of the Roundabout Theatre Company and retains the name Studio 54. A separate restaurant and nightclub, Feinstein’s/54 Below, operates in the basement of the building.


















Rare 1980s Photos Michael Jackson Shooting Music Video Bad

Michael Jackson’s hit song BAD was shot at the Brooklyn Hoyt-Schermerhorn station.  The music video shot by master Martin Scorses was released in November 1986 with an 19 minute short film.

Bad is MIchael Jackson’s seventh record  released on August 31, 1987 in the US by Epic Records and internationally by CBS Records. It was released nearly five years after Jackson’s previous album, Thriller (1982). Bad was recorded during the first half of 1987. The lyrical themes include media bias, paranoia, racial profiling, romance, self-improvement and world peace. The album cemented Jackson’s status as one of the most successful artists of the 1980s.

Bad saw Michael Jackson exercise even more artistic freedom than he did with his two previous Epic releases (Off the Wall and Thriller); Jackson composed nine of the album’s eleven tracks, and received co-producer credit for the entire album. Nine of the eleven songs on Bad were released as singles; one was a promotional single, and another was released outside of the US and Canada. Five of the singles hit No. 1 in the US, while a sixth charted within the top ten, and a seventh charted within the top twenty on the Hot 100. Bad peaked at No. 1 in thirteen countries and charted within the top twenty in other territories. The only songs on the album which were not released as commercial singles were “Speed Demon” and “Just Good Friends”.

This continued Jackson’s commercial success in the late 1980s, and garnered six Grammy Award nominations, winning two. Apart from commercial success, it was well received by contemporary critics. The record produced a record five Billboard Hot 100 number one singles. Bad was ranked No. 43 in the 100 Greatest Albums of All Time of the MTV Generation in 2009 by VH1 and number 202 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Bad has sold an estimated 35 million copies worldwide and has been cited as one of the best-selling albums of all time. In 2017, the album was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America, denoting sales of over ten million copies in the United States.

Photos of of Pimps, Prostitutes and Homeless from 1970s Times Square Through a Bartender’s Camera

In 1972 Shelly Nadelman began a ten-year run bartending at one of New York City’s most notorious dives: the Terminal Bar, located across the street from the Port Authority Bus Terminal near Times Square.

For ten years, right up until the bar closed for good in 1982, he shot thousands of black and white photographs, mostly portraits of his customers— neighborhood regulars, drag queens, thrill-seeking tourists, pimps and prostitutes, midtown office workers dropping by before catching a bus home to the suburbs—all of whom found welcome and respite at the Terminal Bar.

“In the beginning it was just the regulars and they were willing and able to be photographed,” Nadelman said in an interview. “Then there were just faces that came in and I knew I wouldn’t see them again. But they looked interesting. I’d say 90 percent of the people were willing to be photographed.”
In the early 2000s, his grown son Stefan began sorting, scanning, and printing his dad’s negatives, and very quickly realized that the scene at Terminal Bar had become a historic artifact. That New York was fading fast — it was just about gone, in fact — and Sheldon Nadelman had caught it all. The images were eventually made into a book, Terminal Bar, by Princeton Architectural Press; it brings back to life the 1970s presanitized Times Square, a raucous chapter of the city that never sleeps.

Vintage photos of dangerous New York City’s subway system, 1970-1980

During the late 70’s and early 80’s, New York City’s subway system was one of the most dangerous places a person could be. Lucky for those of us who never had the chance to see it, Swiss photographer Willy Spiller was there, and the dark and atmospheric series of photos he took has now come to be known as Hell On Wheels.

These photographs are a joyous and soulful trip in the bygone era of the New York subway system. The photographer Willy Spiller, living in New York at the time, documented his underground travels with the curiosity of a foreigner, fascinated by the rush and the madness of its time. It’s the period of the first rap music, graffiti, The Warriors in the cinema, Guardian Angels on the trains and Ed Koch in charge of a broke and crime-riddled city. Willy Spiller’s images are as much a visual document of this incomparable realm as they are a syncopated, colorful poem to the city of New York and its people.

Unfortunately, Willy Spiller also witnessed a spike in crime, a large portion of which took place in the city’s underground quarters. The rate of violent incidents in the New York subway was so high by 1980 that the NYPD had over 2,300 police officers patrolling the system at all times. Spiller took his chances and documented what he saw.

Though the photos were first released in 1984, Hell On Wheels had its glory restored in 2016. Sturm & Drang publishers put Spiller’s work to print in a limited edition series of hardcover, vivid color coffee table books. “These images hardly tell a story of crime and danger,” Dr. Tobia Bezzola writes in the book’s chilling forward. “Willy Spiller doesn’t discover darkness in the underground but rather an idiosyncratic, vivid realm of its own.”

(Via Rarehistorical Photos)

18 Vintage Photographs Document Runaway Teenagers Living in the Streets of Seattle in the 1980s

Mary Ellen Mark (1941-2015) put her hands on photography in the 1960s, depicting streets scenes in her native Philadelphia as well as anti-Vietnam and women’s rights demonstrations in New York. Quite promptly, when working for Look magazine, the American photographer chose to chronicle the existences of the desperate, the marginals, the homeless, the wounded of life such as Indian street prostitutes, psychiatric patients, juvenile heroine addicts: “I care about people and that’s why I became a photographer.”

In the July 1983 issue of LIFE magazine, writer Cheryl McCall and photographer Mary Ellen Mark published “Streets of the Lost,” an in-depth article and photo essay on Seattle street kids. In the piece, McCall and Mark tell the story of a group of homeless and runaway teens—Tina, a 13-year-old prostitute with dreams of diamonds and furs; Rat and Mike, 16-year-olds who eat from dumpsters; and Dewayne, a 16-year-old boy who hanged himself in a juvenile facility when faced with the prospect of returning to the streets. It’s uneasy subject matter, and a staggering portrait of what life without a stable home can look like.

Despite the darkness of her subjects, Mary Ellen Mark always managed to propose humanistic images, freed from obscenity and disapproval. She also captured the glamour of society as a recognized celebrity portraitist and an on-set photographer for Federico Fellini or Francis Ford Coppola. The photographer succeeded in linking the illustrious with the miserable in the same melancholic yet gentle manner: “I take sad photographs. But look at the tenderness.”

Friends Rat, 16 (far left), and Mike, 17, have this Colt .45 only for defense, they insist, against men who try to pick them up or rob them. "I get hassled a lot" says Rat. "Mike's my protection." They picked Seattle because Mike had once lived there.
Friends Rat, 16 (far left), and Mike, 17, have this Colt .45 only for defense, they insist, against men who try to pick them up or rob them. “I get hassled a lot” says Rat. “Mike’s my protection.” They picked Seattle because Mike had once lived there.
Mike, passing for 18 with a fake I.D., earns $30 a week by selling plasma.
Mike, passing for 18 with a fake I.D., earns $30 a week by selling plasma.
Patti, 16, was arrested minutes after this brawl, cited for simple assault and released. Like many runaways, she learned violence at home and doesn’t hesitate to use it–even though she’s now four months pregnant–to settle all disputes. She is one of nine children, six of whom prefer the terror of the street to life in their Seattle home.
Dark-haired Patti waited until her victim’s pimp was out of sight and then jumped this girl because she never returned a borrowed jacket.
Shaken but unhurt, the girl finds her pimp. He calls the cops.
Shaken but unhurt, the girl finds her pimp. He calls the cops.
Patti’s tender side is reserved for her boyfriend, Munchkin. Patti and her boyfriend, 17, used to share motel rooms with a group of kids. Then Munchkin struck a deal with a motel manager in which Patti exchanges sex with him for a room of their own each night. But they haven’t yet found a solution to the $16 jaywalking and $125 littering tickets they–and all the kids–get almost daily. These are a form of police harassment, and one unpaid littering fine (the only means they have of paying is by prostitution or theft) means five nights in jail.
Erin and her stepfather argue when she’s home. “He doesn’t want me around,” she says. “He wants my mom all to himself.” Erin, 14, has been arrested twice for prostitution. Her probation order states that she must live with her family, not on the streets. Home is a one-room apartment over a tavern in downtown Seattle, and her bed is the couch. Her mother and stepfather, both unemployed, spend most of their time in the bar downstairs. During the year she was on the streets, Erin was raped, was lured into posing for pornographic photographs and supported a pimp by turning tricks.
Laurie, 14, says she was promised $80 by a middle-aged doctor who sexually abused her but reneged on the payment. She recently left Seattle to live with a Christian group in Kent, Wash.
This young dealer is injecting a 14-year-old customer with MDA (methylene dioxy amphetamine) in a crash pad for runaways. At $5 a capsule, MDA is the drug of choice among Seattle street kids–though marijuana is common, and LSD is making a comeback. MDA users need at least five capsules to attain the desired “body rush,” a violent shuddering later followed by sudden vomiting, clenching jaws and twitching eyes. The $1 “rigs” are disposable insulin syringes, but addicts dangerously reuse them as many as 50 times, honing dull needles on matchbook strips and lubricating the plungers with Vaseline.
When a homeless boy collapsed in agonizing spasms, fire department medics speculated his problem was drug related and rushed him to a hospital.
Within an hour of leaving this motel room, the two 14-year-old girls on the right were arrested for prostitution. They call the boy on the bed their “popcorn pimp” because he is only 18.
James, 18, sleeps under a waterfront viaduct.
Rat and Mike call rummaging for food in trash bins behind restaurants dumpster diving.
Rat and Mike call rummaging for food in trash bins behind restaurants dumpster diving.
Rat gives the finger to a man who ignored his begging.
Rat gives the finger to a man who ignored his begging.
This window is the only entry into the hotel.
This window is the only entry into the hotel.

ABBA’a Pretty Blonde: 22 Georgeous Photos of Agnetha Faltskog in the 1970s and1980s

ABBA was a very popular Swedish performing group during the 1970s and the early 1980s. The group was comprised of two females, Agnetha Faltskog and Anni-Frid “Frida” Lyngstad, and two males, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson. Agnetha and Bjorn were married from 1971-1980 and Anni-Frid and Benny were married from 1978-1982.

It was really due to the charm of Agnetha and Frida that ABBA became so popular.

“Bjorn and I may compose the songs, but the girls are the ones who bring in the sound,” Benny said when the group was still together. “If you leave their voices out, it’s not ABBA anymore.”

Agnetha, also known as Anna, was born on April 5, 1950 at Jonkoping, Sweden. She was the blonde woman in ABBA. For men fond of Swedish blondes, Agnetha was a real heart-throb. She was once known in the press as “the woman with the most sexiest bottom of Europe.”

 

 

 

 

(Via VE)

Photos of Donald Trump Before Becoming President-1980s to 1990s

Born in 1946 and grew up in the New York City borough of Queens, Donald John Trump earned an economics degree from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and followed his grandmother Elizabeth and father Fred in running the family real estate company. He renamed it The Trump Organization, and ran it from 1971 until his 2017 inauguration.

Trump’s real estate career focused on building or renovating skyscrapers, hotels, casinos, and golf courses. He has also started multiple side ventures, branded and licensed his name for real estate and various products, and co-authored several books.

Donald Trump during an interview with host Jay Leno on November 19th, 1997
Donald Trump during an interview with host Jay Leno on November 19th, 1997
Donald Trump, tees off at the Stephen Hyde Scholarship Boy Scout Golf Classic at the Seaview Country Club, April 21st, 1992
Donald Trump, tees off at the Stephen Hyde Scholarship Boy Scout Golf Classic at the Seaview Country Club, April 21st, 1992
Donald Trump speaks during a Greater Atlantic City Hotel-Motel Association meeting at the Taj Mahal resort, Atlantic City, May 28th, 1992
Donald Trump speaks during a Greater Atlantic City Hotel-Motel Association meeting at the Taj Mahal resort, Atlantic City, May 28th, 1992
Donald Trump attends a Casino Control Commission hearing on the financial stability of the Taj Mahal resort, Atlantic City, April 6th, 1992
Donald Trump attends a Casino Control Commission hearing on the financial stability of the Taj Mahal resort, Atlantic City, April 6th, 1992
Marla Maples and Donald Trump attend the fight between Evander Holyfield and George Foreman at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, April 19th, 1991
Marla Maples and Donald Trump attend the fight between Evander Holyfield and George Foreman at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, April 19th, 1991
Marla Maples and Donald Trump attend a fight where James Tillis is knocked out by Tommy Morrison at Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, Sept 15th, 1991
Marla Maples and Donald Trump attend a fight where James Tillis is knocked out by Tommy Morrison at Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, Sept 15th, 1991
George Foreman, Donald Trump and Evander Holyfield pose during a press conference to promote their upcoming fight in Atlantic City, New Jersey on April 19th,1991
Donald Trump speaks about the upcoming boxing match between Evander Holyfield (left) and George Foreman (right) at the Taj Mahal Imperial Ballroom, NJ, April 16th, 1991
Donald Trump speaks during a hearing on State involvement in Atlantic City, April 29th, 1990
Donald Trump speaks during a hearing on State involvement in Atlantic City, April 29th, 1990
Donald Trump during a hearing at the Casino Control Commission concerning the Taj Mahal Casino license, Atlantic City, March 30th, 1990
Donald Trump at Casino Control Commission meeting, Atlantic City, NJ, Aug 21st, 1990
Donald Trump at Casino Control Commission meeting, Atlantic City, NJ, Aug 21st, 1990
Donald Trump at Boardwalk rally, NJ, June 16th, 1990
Donald Trump at Boardwalk rally, NJ, June 16th, 1990
Donald Trump and Michael Jackson in a private jet on their way to visit to young HIV patient Ryan White, April 1st,1990
Donald Trump and Michael Jackson in a private jet on their way to visit to young HIV patient Ryan White, April 1st,1990
Donald Trump (center left) at Boardwalk rally, NJ, June 16th, 1990
Donald Trump (center left) at Boardwalk rally, NJ, June 16th, 1990
Donald Trump and his brother, Robert, during a hearing at the Casino Control Commission concerning the Taj Mahal, Atlantic City, March 30th, 1990
Donald Trump and his brother, Robert, during a hearing at the Casino Control Commission concerning the Taj Mahal, Atlantic City, March 30th, 1990
Ivana, Donald Trump, and Merv Griffin at Miss America Pageant, Sept 1989
Ivana, Donald Trump, and Merv Griffin at Miss America Pageant, Sept 1989
Donald Trump sits in with contestants at the Miss America competition in Atlantic City, Sept 1989
Donald Trump sits in with contestants at the Miss America competition in Atlantic City, Sept 1989
Donald Trump in Atlantic City, NJ, 1989
Donald Trump in Atlantic City, NJ, 1989
Real estate magnate Donald Trump poses in front of one of three Sikorsky helicopters at New York Port Authority's West 30 Street Heliport on March 22th, 1988
Real estate magnate Donald Trump poses in front of one of three Sikorsky helicopters at New York Port Authority’s West 30 Street Heliport on March 22th, 1988
Mike Tyson puts an arm around his wife Robin Givens as her mother, Ruth Roper, left, looks on accompanied by real estate tycoon Donald Trump at a press conference in New York, July 12th, 1988
Mike Tyson puts an arm around his wife Robin Givens as her mother, Ruth Roper, left, looks on accompanied by real estate tycoon Donald Trump at a press conference in New York, July 12th, 1988
Heavyweight champion Mike Tyson with his wife, actress Robin Givens and Donald Trump leave the New York State Supreme Court building, July 22nd, 1988
Heavyweight champion Mike Tyson with his wife, actress Robin Givens and Donald Trump leave the New York State Supreme Court building, July 22nd, 1988
Donald Trump speaks during the NJ Bar Association convention in Atlantic City, May 13th, 1988
Donald Trump speaks during the NJ Bar Association convention in Atlantic City, May 13th, 1988
Donald Trump joins his wife, Ivana, when she left her job as president of Trump Castle, Atlantic City, May 18, 1988
Donald Trump joins his wife, Ivana, when she left her job as president of Trump Castle, Atlantic City, May 18, 1988
Donald Trump at Offshore Grand Prix, Atlantic City, NJ, Sept 24th, 1988
Donald Trump at Offshore Grand Prix, Atlantic City, NJ, Sept 24th, 1988
Donald Trump and his wife, Ivana, pose outside the Federal Courthouse after she was sworn in as a United States citizen, May 1988
Donald Trump and his wife, Ivana, pose outside the Federal Courthouse after she was sworn in as a United States citizen, May 1988
Donald Trump, right, pictured with his father, Fred Trump, far left, and boxing promoter Don King at a press conference in Atlantic City, NJ, December 1987
Donald Trump, right, pictured with his father, Fred Trump, far left, and boxing promoter Don King at a press conference in Atlantic City, NJ, December 1987
Donald Trump, real estate mogul, entrepreneur, and billionare spends most of his day attending board meetings in which he manages the construction of his buildings in his offices, New York City, Aug 1987
Donald Trump, real estate mogul, entrepreneur, and billionare spends most of his day attending board meetings in which he manages the construction of his buildings in his offices, New York City, Aug 1987
Donald Trump with NJ Governor Tom Kean on the Trump Princess, Atlantic City, July 17th, 1989
Donald Trump with NJ Governor Tom Kean on the Trump Princess, Atlantic City, July 17th, 1989
Donald Trump speaks in Atlantic City, Aug 21st, 1990
Donald Trump speaks in Atlantic City, Aug 21st, 1990
Donald Trump at a Casino Control Commission meeting, Atlantic City, NJ, 1992
Donald Trump at a Casino Control Commission meeting, Atlantic City, NJ, 1992
Donald Trump with Whitney Houston (left), Cissy Houston, and Michael Houston in Atlantic City, NJ, Dec 16th, 1988
Donald Trump with Whitney Houston (left), Cissy Houston, and Michael Houston in Atlantic City, NJ, Dec 16th, 1988
Donald Trump with Whitney Houston (left), Cissy Houston, and Michael Houston in Atlantic City, NJ, Dec 16th, 1988
Donald Trump with Whitney Houston (left), Cissy Houston, and Michael Houston in Atlantic City, NJ, Dec 16th, 1988

Fun in the sun before Kim Jong-un! Photos from the 70s and 80s show how North Korea portrayed itself as a tourist destination.

  • North Korea was closed to most tourists during the 70s and 80s except those from communist countries
  • Vintage brochures show how those living under communist rule were encourage to take a holiday there 
  • Images show men playing volleyball, families enjoying theme parks, and people eating the local cuisine
  • North Korea still entices tourists to the country today as a source of income and to help spread propaganda 

Today, North Korea only attracts the most hardened and adventurous of travellers, but in the 70s and 80s those living in communist countries were encourage to visit in droves.

Vintage advertising shows how then-leader Kim Il-sung attempted to lure people to the country, with pictures of people relaxing on beaches, enjoying theme park rides and eating the local cuisine.  

These snapshots were taken before the collapse of the USSR. During this time, virtually no foreigners were allowed entry to North Korea except for communist allies.

A family enjoys a ride at the Taesongsan Funfair, which is located close to Pyongyang and is still open today. The park is named for Mount Taesong.
A family enjoys a ride at the Taesongsan Funfair, which is located close to Pyongyang and is still open today. The park is named for Mount Taesong.
This is how North Korea advertised itself to potential tourists back in the 1970s and 80s when only visitor from allied communist countries were allowed within its borders
This is how North Korea advertised itself to potential tourists back in the 1970s and 80s when only visitor from allied communist countries were allowed within its borders
The beach in Wonsan is filled with tourists, most like from the USSR, in this 1980s snap that was included in a brochure given to prospective visitors
People enjoying a diving platform in the city of Wonsan. Tourism was and is an important source of income for North Korea, as well as helping spread its propaganda
Gymnastics classes were another of the cultural offerings for potential communist visitors. Women are pictured taking part in a class on Songdowon beach here
Among the many attractions potential tourists had waiting for them include volleyball, a favourite sport in North Korea, which is pictured being played here on Wonsan beach
Unlike the beaches of Spain or Greece, which would have been packed with tourists in the 1990s when this snap was taken, the sand in Hamhung is virtually deserted
A mother and her children relax at Taesongsan Waterpark, located near the capital.
A mother and her children relax at Taesongsan Waterpark, located near the capital.
A view of the Mansu Hill Grand Monument in central Pyongyang in North Korea. A statue of Kim Jong-il has since been added to stand next to the one of his father, Kim Il-sung, who is pictured here.
A view of the Mansu Hill Grand Monument in central Pyongyang in North Korea. A statue of Kim Jong-il has since been added to stand next to the one of his father, Kim Il-sung, who is pictured here.
A woman hails a taxi outside Ryanggang Hotel, in Pyongyang, in 1986.
A woman hails a taxi outside Ryanggang Hotel, in Pyongyang, in 1986.
Bumper cars modeled to look like vehicles from the 1970s and 80s were advertised to potential tourists as a reason to visit.
Bumper cars modeled to look like vehicles from the 1970s and 80s were advertised to potential tourists as a reason to visit.
Parents watch their children take a ride on the funfair at Taesongsan in 1980. The park was first opened in 1977 and features 10 rides, though its main rollercoaster was damaged by flooding in 2007 and does not operate.
The rocket ride at Taesongsan Funfair. North Korea operates several theme parks around the country, the most famous of which is Pyongyang Zoo, which continues to be a major tourist draw to this day.
The rocket ride at Taesongsan Funfair. North Korea operates several theme parks around the country, the most famous of which is Pyongyang Zoo, which continues to be a major tourist draw to this day.
This is the beach at Majon, in North Korea’s second-largest city of Hamhung, photographed some time in the 1990s.
Men and women queue to go on the teacup rise at Taesongsan Funfair some time in the 1980s. The theme park has been updated little since it was first built, and now struggles to operate

Put Boobs On It! Sex Sells 1970 Album Covers

In the 1960s-1980s, if you wanted to sell your record, the most reliable method may have been to simply put a pair of boobs on the cover.  It was a variation on the “sex sells” approach – you might call it “chests sells”.  Whether it was subtle cleavage or loud-and-proud bosoms, we know the strategy worked simply because it was used so unbelievably often – with EZ Listening artists being the prime culprits.

L) Gitti wanted to keep it classy, but Erika said, “To hell with that. There are bills to pay.” (R) Sold! Even though I’ll probably hate the music, I can’t think of a reason not to buy this album of Scandinavian folk music.

 

 

More faceless women and their boobs as album cover centerpieces.
In case you haven’t picked up on the pattern – almost none of these cleavage-bearing ladies are actually the artist featured on the albums. This ain’t Victor Lazlo – his sorry visage is lucky to even appear on the back cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The record on the left is by a group called The Cuarto Hombres. Needless to say, none of the “four guys” made the cut for the front cover. At right, Serena Grandi is busting out front and center… Simon Boswell is MIA.
That’s not Marin Denny, and that’s not Fred Weyrich. But that’s not to say no female musicians and singers opted to flaunt their assets for record sales. A few more examples…

 

This album by Elkie Brooks often makes the top ten of ‘worst album covers’ lists. I think this is primarily due to the fact that Ms. Brooks was and is a well-respected artist and her spastic-breast-exposing-contortion seemed unbecoming and “beneath” such a talent. I happen to love it.

You might also like this 1970s forgotten album cover art.