Photos of New York City’s Street Scenes from between the 1960s-70s

Photographer Paul McDonough has a knack for catching passing, off-kilter incongruities on the New York City streets. He arrived in the city in 1967 and started taking photographs of unique moments happening around him; the New York City 1968-1972 series is said to be his first as a photographer.

Capturing weirdness on the streets of New York City might seem like an easy feat, but McDonough has a rare ability to capture a confluence of gestures in the exact moment in which a great photograph happens.



















Rare Photos of Showing Brutal Life of North Koreans During Winter of 1973

These rare photos of North Korea, were taken in 1973 by British Photographer John Bulmer and published in the British Sunday Times. North Korea was even more isolated during this period than it currently is.

School boys listening to a museum tour guide
School boys listening to a museum tour guide
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
Kim IlSung's portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim IlSung’s portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
School children walking along the Pyongyang People's Palace
School children walking along the Pyongyang People’s Palace
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung's birthplace.
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung’s birthplace.
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea. Notice that there are no locals milling about.
Girls in Pyongyang City.
Girls in Pyongyang City.

26 Wild Photos of New Yorks Notorious Studio 54 Disco Club

Studio 54 is a former nightclub and currently a Broadway theatre, located at 254 West 54th Street, between Eighth Avenue and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, originally built as the Gallo Opera House, opened in 1927, after which it changed names several times, eventually becoming CBS radio and television Studio 52.

In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.The nightclub founders spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on professional lighting design and kept many of the former TV and theatrical sets, in the process creating a unique dance club that became famous for its celebrity guest lists, restrictive (and subjective) entry policies (based on one’s appearance and style), and open club drug use. Founded and created by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager in 1977, it was sold in 1980 to Mark Fleischman,[7][8][9] who reopened the club after it had been shut down following the conviction of Rubell and Schrager on charges of tax evasion. In 1984, Fleischman sold the club, which continued to operate until 1986.

Since November 1998, it has served as a venue for productions of the Roundabout Theatre Company and retains the name Studio 54. A separate restaurant and nightclub, Feinstein’s/54 Below, operates in the basement of the building.


















Photos of of Pimps, Prostitutes and Homeless from 1970s Times Square Through a Bartender’s Camera

In 1972 Shelly Nadelman began a ten-year run bartending at one of New York City’s most notorious dives: the Terminal Bar, located across the street from the Port Authority Bus Terminal near Times Square.

For ten years, right up until the bar closed for good in 1982, he shot thousands of black and white photographs, mostly portraits of his customers— neighborhood regulars, drag queens, thrill-seeking tourists, pimps and prostitutes, midtown office workers dropping by before catching a bus home to the suburbs—all of whom found welcome and respite at the Terminal Bar.

“In the beginning it was just the regulars and they were willing and able to be photographed,” Nadelman said in an interview. “Then there were just faces that came in and I knew I wouldn’t see them again. But they looked interesting. I’d say 90 percent of the people were willing to be photographed.”
In the early 2000s, his grown son Stefan began sorting, scanning, and printing his dad’s negatives, and very quickly realized that the scene at Terminal Bar had become a historic artifact. That New York was fading fast — it was just about gone, in fact — and Sheldon Nadelman had caught it all. The images were eventually made into a book, Terminal Bar, by Princeton Architectural Press; it brings back to life the 1970s presanitized Times Square, a raucous chapter of the city that never sleeps.

Vintage photos of dangerous New York City’s subway system, 1970-1980

During the late 70’s and early 80’s, New York City’s subway system was one of the most dangerous places a person could be. Lucky for those of us who never had the chance to see it, Swiss photographer Willy Spiller was there, and the dark and atmospheric series of photos he took has now come to be known as Hell On Wheels.

These photographs are a joyous and soulful trip in the bygone era of the New York subway system. The photographer Willy Spiller, living in New York at the time, documented his underground travels with the curiosity of a foreigner, fascinated by the rush and the madness of its time. It’s the period of the first rap music, graffiti, The Warriors in the cinema, Guardian Angels on the trains and Ed Koch in charge of a broke and crime-riddled city. Willy Spiller’s images are as much a visual document of this incomparable realm as they are a syncopated, colorful poem to the city of New York and its people.

Unfortunately, Willy Spiller also witnessed a spike in crime, a large portion of which took place in the city’s underground quarters. The rate of violent incidents in the New York subway was so high by 1980 that the NYPD had over 2,300 police officers patrolling the system at all times. Spiller took his chances and documented what he saw.

Though the photos were first released in 1984, Hell On Wheels had its glory restored in 2016. Sturm & Drang publishers put Spiller’s work to print in a limited edition series of hardcover, vivid color coffee table books. “These images hardly tell a story of crime and danger,” Dr. Tobia Bezzola writes in the book’s chilling forward. “Willy Spiller doesn’t discover darkness in the underground but rather an idiosyncratic, vivid realm of its own.”

(Via Rarehistorical Photos)

14 Stunning Photos of African Americans in Chicago in the 1970s

From June through October 1973 and briefly during the spring of 1974, John H. White, a 28-year-old photographer with the Chicago Daily News, worked for the federal government photographing Chicago, especially the city`s African American community. White took his photographs for the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) DOCUMERICA project. As White reflected recently, he saw his assignment as “an opportunity to capture a slice of life, to capture history.” His photographs portray the difficult circumstances faced by many of Chicago`s African American residents in the early 1970s, but they also catch the “spirit, love, zeal, pride, and hopes of the community.”

Today, John White is a staff photographer with the Chicago Sun-Times. He has won hundreds of awards, and his work has been exhibited and published widely. In 1982 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.

Sunrise on Lake Michigan with Chicago shown in the background. March 1973.
(National Archives and Records Administration)

 

Black sidewalk salesmen arranging their fresh fruits and vegetables on Chicago’s South Side. June 1973

 

Black products was one of the themes at the annual Black Expo held in Chicago. October 1973
Empty housing in the ghetto on Chicago`s South Side. May 1973
Chicago ghetto on the South Side. May 1973

“Chicago ghetto on the South Side. Although the percentage of Chicago blacks making $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58% between 1960 and 1970, a large percentage still remained unemployed. The black unemployment rate is generally assumed to be twice that of the national unemployment rate published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.”

The captions are John White’s own, written some time after he took his photographs. In some cases White used virtually the same caption for several images.
“Black youths play basketball at Stateway Gardens’ high-rise housing project on Chicago’s South Side. The complex has eight buildings with 1,633 two and three bedroom apartments housing 6,825 persons. They were built under the U.S. Housing Acts of 1949 and 1968. They are managed by the Chicago Housing Authority which is responsible for 41,500 public housing dwellings.”

 

“Black youngsters cool off with fire hydrant water on Chicago’s South Side in the Woodlawn community. The kids don’t go to the city beaches and use the fire hydrants to cool off instead. It’s a tradition in the community, comprised of very low income people. The area has high crime and fire records. From 1960 to 1970 the percentage of Chicago blacks with income of $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58%.”
“Young woman soliciting funds for a Chicago organization in a shopping center parking lot. She is one of the nearly 1.2 million black people who make up over a third of the population of Chicago. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. The photos are portraits that reflect pride, love, beauty, hope, struggle, joy, hate, frustration, discontent, worship, and faith. She is a member of her race who is proud of her heritage.”

 

“Minority youngsters who have gathered to have their picture taken on Chicago’s South Side during a talent show. Blacks make up over one third of the 3.6 million population in the city. Chicago census figures for 1970 show a significant gap in economic security between blacks and whites. Only 35% of black families earned $10,000 to $25,000 compared to 60% of white families. Of families earning less than $8,000 a total of 50% were black compared to 21% white.”
“A black man painting a store front on South Wabash Street. One of the nearly 1.2 million people of his race who make up over a third of Chicago’s population. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. In short, they are portraits of human beings who feel they are individuals and are proud of their heritage.” July 1973

 

Religious fervor is mirrored on the face of a Black Muslim woman, one of some 10,000 listening to Elijah Muhammad deliver his annual Savior’s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
`The Fruit of Islam,` a special group of bodyguards for Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad, sits at the bottom of the platform while he delivers his annual Savior`s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
Black bongo player performs at the International Amphitheater in Chicago as part of the annual PUSH [People United to Save Humanity] ‘Black Expo’ in the fall of 1973. October 1973
The Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks on a radio broadcast from the headquarters of Operation PUSH, [People United to Save Humanity] at its annual convention. July 1973
(All photos and text courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)

ABBA’a Pretty Blonde: 22 Georgeous Photos of Agnetha Faltskog in the 1970s and1980s

ABBA was a very popular Swedish performing group during the 1970s and the early 1980s. The group was comprised of two females, Agnetha Faltskog and Anni-Frid “Frida” Lyngstad, and two males, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson. Agnetha and Bjorn were married from 1971-1980 and Anni-Frid and Benny were married from 1978-1982.

It was really due to the charm of Agnetha and Frida that ABBA became so popular.

“Bjorn and I may compose the songs, but the girls are the ones who bring in the sound,” Benny said when the group was still together. “If you leave their voices out, it’s not ABBA anymore.”

Agnetha, also known as Anna, was born on April 5, 1950 at Jonkoping, Sweden. She was the blonde woman in ABBA. For men fond of Swedish blondes, Agnetha was a real heart-throb. She was once known in the press as “the woman with the most sexiest bottom of Europe.”

 

 

 

 

(Via VE)

Fun in the sun before Kim Jong-un! Photos from the 70s and 80s show how North Korea portrayed itself as a tourist destination.

  • North Korea was closed to most tourists during the 70s and 80s except those from communist countries
  • Vintage brochures show how those living under communist rule were encourage to take a holiday there 
  • Images show men playing volleyball, families enjoying theme parks, and people eating the local cuisine
  • North Korea still entices tourists to the country today as a source of income and to help spread propaganda 

Today, North Korea only attracts the most hardened and adventurous of travellers, but in the 70s and 80s those living in communist countries were encourage to visit in droves.

Vintage advertising shows how then-leader Kim Il-sung attempted to lure people to the country, with pictures of people relaxing on beaches, enjoying theme park rides and eating the local cuisine.  

These snapshots were taken before the collapse of the USSR. During this time, virtually no foreigners were allowed entry to North Korea except for communist allies.

A family enjoys a ride at the Taesongsan Funfair, which is located close to Pyongyang and is still open today. The park is named for Mount Taesong.
A family enjoys a ride at the Taesongsan Funfair, which is located close to Pyongyang and is still open today. The park is named for Mount Taesong.
This is how North Korea advertised itself to potential tourists back in the 1970s and 80s when only visitor from allied communist countries were allowed within its borders
This is how North Korea advertised itself to potential tourists back in the 1970s and 80s when only visitor from allied communist countries were allowed within its borders
The beach in Wonsan is filled with tourists, most like from the USSR, in this 1980s snap that was included in a brochure given to prospective visitors
People enjoying a diving platform in the city of Wonsan. Tourism was and is an important source of income for North Korea, as well as helping spread its propaganda
Gymnastics classes were another of the cultural offerings for potential communist visitors. Women are pictured taking part in a class on Songdowon beach here
Among the many attractions potential tourists had waiting for them include volleyball, a favourite sport in North Korea, which is pictured being played here on Wonsan beach
Unlike the beaches of Spain or Greece, which would have been packed with tourists in the 1990s when this snap was taken, the sand in Hamhung is virtually deserted
A mother and her children relax at Taesongsan Waterpark, located near the capital.
A mother and her children relax at Taesongsan Waterpark, located near the capital.
A view of the Mansu Hill Grand Monument in central Pyongyang in North Korea. A statue of Kim Jong-il has since been added to stand next to the one of his father, Kim Il-sung, who is pictured here.
A view of the Mansu Hill Grand Monument in central Pyongyang in North Korea. A statue of Kim Jong-il has since been added to stand next to the one of his father, Kim Il-sung, who is pictured here.
A woman hails a taxi outside Ryanggang Hotel, in Pyongyang, in 1986.
A woman hails a taxi outside Ryanggang Hotel, in Pyongyang, in 1986.
Bumper cars modeled to look like vehicles from the 1970s and 80s were advertised to potential tourists as a reason to visit.
Bumper cars modeled to look like vehicles from the 1970s and 80s were advertised to potential tourists as a reason to visit.
Parents watch their children take a ride on the funfair at Taesongsan in 1980. The park was first opened in 1977 and features 10 rides, though its main rollercoaster was damaged by flooding in 2007 and does not operate.
The rocket ride at Taesongsan Funfair. North Korea operates several theme parks around the country, the most famous of which is Pyongyang Zoo, which continues to be a major tourist draw to this day.
The rocket ride at Taesongsan Funfair. North Korea operates several theme parks around the country, the most famous of which is Pyongyang Zoo, which continues to be a major tourist draw to this day.
This is the beach at Majon, in North Korea’s second-largest city of Hamhung, photographed some time in the 1990s.
Men and women queue to go on the teacup rise at Taesongsan Funfair some time in the 1980s. The theme park has been updated little since it was first built, and now struggles to operate

Put Boobs On It! Sex Sells 1970 Album Covers

In the 1960s-1980s, if you wanted to sell your record, the most reliable method may have been to simply put a pair of boobs on the cover.  It was a variation on the “sex sells” approach – you might call it “chests sells”.  Whether it was subtle cleavage or loud-and-proud bosoms, we know the strategy worked simply because it was used so unbelievably often – with EZ Listening artists being the prime culprits.

L) Gitti wanted to keep it classy, but Erika said, “To hell with that. There are bills to pay.” (R) Sold! Even though I’ll probably hate the music, I can’t think of a reason not to buy this album of Scandinavian folk music.

 

 

More faceless women and their boobs as album cover centerpieces.
In case you haven’t picked up on the pattern – almost none of these cleavage-bearing ladies are actually the artist featured on the albums. This ain’t Victor Lazlo – his sorry visage is lucky to even appear on the back cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The record on the left is by a group called The Cuarto Hombres. Needless to say, none of the “four guys” made the cut for the front cover. At right, Serena Grandi is busting out front and center… Simon Boswell is MIA.
That’s not Marin Denny, and that’s not Fred Weyrich. But that’s not to say no female musicians and singers opted to flaunt their assets for record sales. A few more examples…

 

This album by Elkie Brooks often makes the top ten of ‘worst album covers’ lists. I think this is primarily due to the fact that Ms. Brooks was and is a well-respected artist and her spastic-breast-exposing-contortion seemed unbecoming and “beneath” such a talent. I happen to love it.

You might also like this 1970s forgotten album cover art.

30 Wild Photos That Capture the Disco Scene of the 1970s

The heyday of the 1970s disco scene fashion blossomed from the music played at gay underground New York clubs such as the Loft, Tenth Floor, and 12 West in the early 1970s. Other clubs such as Infinity, Flamingo, the Paradise Garage, Le Jardin, and the Saint launched a disco culture that brought with it an anything-goes attitude and all-night dancing.

Studio 54 became the place to be seen in disco clothing such as boob-tubes, platform shoes, flared trousers and body-conscious shapes dressed in lurex, glitter and crazy patterns or colours. Studio 54 played an essential role creating the nightclub scene that is still with us today – a place where people dress to be noticed and in the latest fashion.

The successful movie Saturday Night Fever (1977) ensured that disco hung around for a few years before becoming very unfashionable when Punk Rock and New Wave became the new anti-fashion fashion. Below are 30 vintage photographs that show just how crazy 1970s disco really was…

A group of people get down on a mirrored dance floor, circa 1978. (David Redfern / Redferns)
A group of people get down on a mirrored dance floor, circa 1978. (David Redfern / Redferns)
1970s disco scene. The Village People perform live as the audience dance the “YMCA” at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California, circa 1970. (Amanda Edwards / Redferns / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene
A couple bring their dancing to the floor of the disco club Fun House in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Divine, Grace Jones, and friends celebrate Jones’ birthday at Xenon, 1978. (Ron Galella / WireImage / Getty Images)
A man blowing a whistle in a sparkling purple outfit dances at Studio 54, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman dances amid other partygoers at Studio 54, 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A man performs with fire at the disco club Infinity in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Bianca Jagger rides into Studio 54 on a white horse during her birthday celebrations in 1977. (Rose Hartman / Getty Images)
A woman dances in ecstasy at a disco in New York City, 1976. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
The Jacksons perform during a concert, circa 1975. (Gary Merrin / Getty Images)
A couple dance at Studio 54 in 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
People dances on couches at Xenon, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. A group of DJs spin records at a disco club in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A group of partygoers join in a synchronized dance number in an unidentified club, circa 1977. (David Redfern / Redferns / Getty Images)
A woman dances between two men at Studio 54, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A dance club blends into a kaleidoscopic haze at a disco club in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Grace Jones at the disco club Studio 54 in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Grace Jones at the disco club Studio 54 in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Metallic-painted dancers at a disco club perform on stage in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman known as “Disco Granny” dances with a young man at Studio 54, circa 1978. (Images Press / Getty Images)
A crowd of dancers at the disco club in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A disco DJ smokes a cigarette while spinning a record at a club in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman enters the dance floor at Studio 54, 1977. 1970s disco scene.
A couple wearing matching high socks dance at the disco club Xenon in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman wipes the sweat from her face at Studio 54, 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A group of older men and women relax on the sidelines of a disco club in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Actor and singer Grace Jones gives a big smile to the camera while partying at Studio 54 in New York City, 1978. (Rose Hartman / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. A man and woman take center stage on the dance floor at the disco club 2001 Odyssey in Brooklyn, New York, in 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
The Queen of Disco Donna Summer performs onstage in a feather costume, circa 1976. (Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. David Bowie and Dutch actor and singer Romy Haag have a smoke at the Alcazar nightclub in Paris during 1976. (Rda / Getty Images)