Rare 1920s Car Ads for Lovers of Vintage Car Ads

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These vintage car ads are fun to read. Some names are still familiar like the Studebaker and others not so much.  The Jones-Six anyone? Imagine getting a car today for the prices found in these 1920s car ads!

Vintage Car Ads

1920s-car-ads

 

 

“One car alone is not sufficient for Our larger families. It always seems that Dad and Mother want to use it at the Same time that Bobbie Laura want go drive out to a dance or bridge party. A practical way out of this difficulty is to make your second car a used one. NOW, during this great Co-operative Sale Of Used Cars, is the best time to buy. Every day from May 22 to June 5 dealers are offering special values in all makes and models. “

“This year the sale of cars powered by the famous Knight sleeve-vale engine will more than double the sales for any previous year; and this remarkable growth is due to the fact that more people are learning about the Knight sleeve-valve principle and the amazing performance of this type of motor. Knight engine performance means a quick smooth flow of power that surpasses ordinary six-cylinder performance just as the average six surpass the four. The Falcon-Knight six-cylinder sleeve-valve engine with seven bearing crankshaft, places America’s finest type of motor in the lower price range. The Falcon-Knight chassis throughout is designed and constructed in keeping with the excellence of the motor.” (05 Jun 1927, Page 78 – The Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

More Vintage Card Ads – 1920s Car Ads

vintage car ads 1920s-car-ads

1920s-car-ads

vintage car ads

1920s-car-ads
“The Studebaker Standard Six Sedan can now be yours at a price that represents a reduction of $100 on one of the finest closed cars every built by Studebaker, the lowest price at which a Studebaker Sedan has ever been sold. Every high standard of Studebaker manufacture has been rigidly maintained for you at the new, low price. A price made possible by a 23% increase in sales in 1925 and by savings effected through Studebaker’s one-profit plan of manufacture. ” (The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 24 January 1926″
vintage car ads
1920s car ads for the Whippet

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19 Bizarre Old Photos of Women and Guns

women and guns photo

These 19 old photos of women and guns show that American’s have a long and bizarre obsession with this instrument of death. There is something quite disturbing about a women or anyone for that matter, who cracks a big smile for the camera as they pose with their favourite rifle.  Guns are known to blow holes in people’s heads, but oh what a great fashion accessory they make!

 

women and guns photo
Maryland woman takes skeet shooting title. Westmoreland Hills, MD. Jan. 5. Mrs. Albert F. Walker of this town has been declared 1937 women’s skeet shooting champion of the country by the National Skeet Shooting Association. The Association has released the averages on which the ratings were based, but one day last year at the Kenwood, MD, skeet club, Mrs. Walker set the woman’s record fall with 99×100 (skeet for 99 birds out of a possible 100). In addition to her national title, she outranks both men and women shooters in the District of Columbia and Maryland, 1/5/38
women and guns photo
women and guns
women and guns photo
A sure shot, 1910
women and guns photo
1911 cartoon shows a woman, possibly Coco Chanel, wearing a large hat with feathers, shooting at large white birds with a rifle; two dogs labeled “French Milliner” place the dead birds on a pile at her feet.
women and guns photo
Woman policeman with gun feigning arrest of a man, 1900
women and guns photo
The .25 caliber Colt advertisement, 1912
women and guns photo
women and guns – seated at table, inspecting 45 automatic pistol parts, at Colt’s Patent Fire Arms Plant, Hartford, Connecticut, 1914
women and guns photo
Woman in cowgirl clothing, seated at table with deck of cards and chips, pointing pistol, with arm on table. 1912
women and guns photo
The moonshiner’s daughter, 1901
women and guns photo
Blanche Rogers with pistol, 1910
women and guns photo
Grace Stockman of Natl. Museum with Andrew Jackson pistols, 1926
women and guns photo
Miss Grace Stockman with President Andrew Jackson’s dueling pistols, at the National Museum , 1926
women and guns photo
Training a policewoman–target practice under the direction of Inspector Cross of the police department–Inspector Cross demonstrates the correct way to hold a “gat” , 1909
women and guns photo
In the field, 1876
women and guns photo
Photograph shows occupational portrait of taxidermist Martha A. Maxwell with animal specimens, palette, and rifle. 1876
women and guns photo
women and guns – Washington Univ. Girls Rifle Team, 1927
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley, with gun Buffalo Bill gave her, 1922
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley – famous rifle shot and holder of the Police Gazette championship medal, 1899
women and guns photo
Mary Agnes Shanley, New York City detective, half-length portrait, facing left, pulling a pistol out of her handbag, 1937

11 Wild Vintage Womens Bathing Suits

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These photos of 1920s vintage womens bathing suits show that fashion had lightened up a bit since the old fashioned swimming suits worn in the late 1800’s.  However, compared with the style’s of today, these bathing suits are still quite modest.

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Measuring bathing suits, June 30, 1922, Washington, D.C.

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Miss Washington in bathing suit at Wardman Park pool, 1922
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Bathing beaches – New York beauties in vintage women’s bathing suits at Atlantic City, 1922
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Two women in bathing costumes drying their hair, 1925
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Vintage women’s bathing suits from1920
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Rear view of Lillian Langston, Edith Roberts, and Myrtle Reeves, with hands joined, wearing bathing suits and looking over their shoulders, on beach, 1918
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Roxy McGowan and Mary Thurman in bathing suits, with one taking the other’s picture on beach, posed for Mack Sennett Productions] / Evans Studio, L.A., 1918
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What it takes to melt a snowman this young lady has – Miss Fritzi Ridgeway, 1924
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Muff in hand. Alice Maison, 1918
Water nymphs, 1922

If you liked these antique bathing suits check out these beauty contestants from the 1920’s.

Silent Movie Star Beauty Maude Fealy

Maude Fealy, 1915

These vintage photos of Maude Fealy show exactly how incredibly beautiful this American stage and silent film actress was. Born in 1883, she was one of the lucky few whose career survived into the talkie era. She retired in 1958.

Maude Fealy photo

Maude Fealy photo

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Maude Fealy actress 1911 vintage photos

Maude Fealy in Moths, movie poster Maude Fealy

Maude Fealy’s first silent film was made for Thanhouse Studio in 1911. She starred in Moths and the Legend of Provence.  Although under contract with them she left early to perform on stage with her husband.

Fealy was a great friend of the legendary director Cecil B. DeMille and it was him who offered her many film roles.  The Ten Commandments, filmed in 1956 was one such movie.

The pretty Maude Fealy was believed to have been married to the actor William Gillette.  This however was only a rumour.  She was married and divorced three times:

John Cort Jr. (9 January 1920 – 1923) (annulled)
James Durkin (28 November 1909 – 18 June 1917) (divorced)
Louis Sherwin (15 July 1907 – 25 September 1909) (divorced)

The following humours quote is attributed to actress.  She said it upon meeting actor William Gillett:

When he said I looked too young I hurried downtown and got my first long skirt. When next I saw Mr. Gillette my hair was done up for the first time, and I wore high heeled slippers, so that I looked a good deal more of a woman. He laughed and said I looked lots older, but I know I didn’t. I will never forget that skirt. It didn’t fit me – it didn’t begin to. The amount of trouble I had to try and make it presentable would only be appreciated by a woman. However, I firmly believe that skirt got me the position, and, as I consider myself a very fortunate girl in getting it, I naturally cherish my first long skirt.

Maude Fealy died on November 9, 1971 in Los Angeles.  Anita Page was a contemporary of Fealy and has some great photos too!

Rare Vintage Photos of Presidential Inaugurations

Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]

Rare presidential inaugurations photos starting with 1869 and the inauguration of U.S. president Grant.

Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations- Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]
Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol 1877. March 4, 1877 fell on Sunday, so Hayes privately took oath of office on Saturday, March 3, in the White House Red Room to ensure peaceful transition of power; the public Inauguration was on Monday, March 5.
Presidential Inaugurations
President Garfield in reviewing stand, viewing inauguration ceremonies, March 4, 1881
Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller administering the oath  to Benjamin Harrison on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1889
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon [i.e. Edward J. Stellwagen], Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman--A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman–A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies. 1909
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Presidential Inaugurations – Oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929
Presidential Inaugurations – Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929

 

Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949
Presidential Inaugurations – Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949