19 Bizarre Old Photos of Women and Guns

women and guns photo

These 19 old photos of women and guns show that American’s have a long and bizarre obsession with this instrument of death. There is something quite disturbing about a women or anyone for that matter, who cracks a big smile for the camera as they pose with their favourite rifle.  Guns are known to blow holes in people’s heads, but oh what a great fashion accessory they make!

 

women and guns photo
Maryland woman takes skeet shooting title. Westmoreland Hills, MD. Jan. 5. Mrs. Albert F. Walker of this town has been declared 1937 women’s skeet shooting champion of the country by the National Skeet Shooting Association. The Association has released the averages on which the ratings were based, but one day last year at the Kenwood, MD, skeet club, Mrs. Walker set the woman’s record fall with 99×100 (skeet for 99 birds out of a possible 100). In addition to her national title, she outranks both men and women shooters in the District of Columbia and Maryland, 1/5/38
women and guns photo
women and guns
women and guns photo
A sure shot, 1910
women and guns photo
1911 cartoon shows a woman, possibly Coco Chanel, wearing a large hat with feathers, shooting at large white birds with a rifle; two dogs labeled “French Milliner” place the dead birds on a pile at her feet.
women and guns photo
Woman policeman with gun feigning arrest of a man, 1900
women and guns photo
The .25 caliber Colt advertisement, 1912
women and guns photo
women and guns – seated at table, inspecting 45 automatic pistol parts, at Colt’s Patent Fire Arms Plant, Hartford, Connecticut, 1914
women and guns photo
Woman in cowgirl clothing, seated at table with deck of cards and chips, pointing pistol, with arm on table. 1912
women and guns photo
The moonshiner’s daughter, 1901
women and guns photo
Blanche Rogers with pistol, 1910
women and guns photo
Grace Stockman of Natl. Museum with Andrew Jackson pistols, 1926
women and guns photo
Miss Grace Stockman with President Andrew Jackson’s dueling pistols, at the National Museum , 1926
women and guns photo
Training a policewoman–target practice under the direction of Inspector Cross of the police department–Inspector Cross demonstrates the correct way to hold a “gat” , 1909
women and guns photo
In the field, 1876
women and guns photo
Photograph shows occupational portrait of taxidermist Martha A. Maxwell with animal specimens, palette, and rifle. 1876
women and guns photo
women and guns – Washington Univ. Girls Rifle Team, 1927
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley, with gun Buffalo Bill gave her, 1922
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley – famous rifle shot and holder of the Police Gazette championship medal, 1899
women and guns photo
Mary Agnes Shanley, New York City detective, half-length portrait, facing left, pulling a pistol out of her handbag, 1937

Telegraph Messenger Boys and Their Shocking Stories

messenger telegraph boys photo

These photos of telegraph messenger boys taken at the turn of the 19th century seem innocent and almost charming on the surface. However, most of the children led troubled lives that involved drugs and alcohol. Lewis Wick Hine, an American sociologist and photographer joined the National Child Labour Committee in 1908. He spent ten years interviewing and photographing messenger boys and as a result exposed how they were cruelly exploited.  The captions for each of these photos are attributed to Hine.

messenger telegraph boys photo
Messenger boy working for Mackay Telegraph Company. Said fifteen years old. Exposed to Red Light dangers. Location: Waco, Texas. 1913 (Lewis Wick Hine)

messenger telegraph boys photo

messenger telegraph boys photo
Jacksonville, Florida, messenger boy. 1913
messenger telegraph boys photo
A typical messenger boy in New Orleans. The telegraph companies are trying to obey the law, and few violations occur. 1913  
Telegraph messenger boys. Danville Messengers. The smallest boy, Western Union No. 5 is only ten years old, and is working as extra boy. He said he was going to be laid off as the manager told him he was too young, but an older messenger told me the reason was that the other messengers were having him put off because he cuts into their earnings. See Hine report on Va. messengers for data about the tallest boy. Location: Danville, Virginia. 1911 (Lewis Wick Hine)
messenger telegraph boys photo
Postal Telegraph boy, Danville, Va. Location: Danville, Virginia 1911 
messenger telegraph boys photo
Eleven year old Western Union messenger #51. J.T. Marshall. Been day boy here for five months. Goes to Red Light district some and knows some of the girls. Location: Houston, Texas. 1913
messenger telegraph boys photo
A.D.T. boy, 13 years old. 1 1/2 years at it; works from noon till 10:30 P.M. Said he “carries notes, etc.” Location: Burlington, Vermont. 1910
messenger telegraph boys photo
Postal Telegraph Boy. David Caplan, 9 Monroe Street. Said he was 15 years old. Works from 11 P.M. to 8 A. M., often down around the docks. Location: New York, New York 1908
messenger telegraph boys photo
Preston DeCosta , fifteen year old messenger #3 for Bellevue Messenger Service. I ran across him and took photos while he was carrying notes back and forth between a prostitute in jail and a pimp in the Red Light. He had read all the notes and knew all about the correspondence. He was a fine grained adolescent boy. Has been delivering message and drugs in the Red Light for 6 months and knows the ropes thoroughly. “A lot of these girls are my regular customers. I carry ’em messages and get ’em drinks, drugs, etc. Also go to the bank with money for ’em. If a fellow treats ’em right, they’ll call him by number and give him all their work. I got a box full of photos I took of these girls – some of ’em I took in their room.” Works until 11:00 P.M. Location: San Antonio, Texas.
messenger telegraph boys photo
Telegraph messenger boys. Group of Dime Messengers Service boys, 1228 H St., N.W., at the main office. The youngest boys are Eddie Tahoory (14 yrs. old) . Said to be a recent comer. Lives, 108 Fourth St., N.E., and Earle Griffith (15 yrs. old), 107 Fifteenth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. From a questionable home. Mother eloped with boarder. Took children with her. They said they never know when they were going to get home at night. Usually work one or more nights a week, and have worked until after midnight. They said last Christmas their office had a 9 yr. old boy running errands for them, and that he made a great deal of money from tips. They make about $7 a week and more, sometimes. Said “The office is not allowed to send us into the red light district, but we go when a call sends us. Not very often.” 1912
messenger telegraph boys photo
Fifteen year old delivery boy for Linders Drug Store, which is located on the edge of the Reservation, Griffin Street. The boy has just returned from a trip to these Houses. He works from 8 A.M. to 8 P.M. Location: Dallas, Texas.
messenger telegraph boys photo
Luther Wharton, drug store delivery boy, twelve years old. Works from 4:00 P.M. to midnight in Sommers Drug Store. I saw him working at midnight. He goes to school in the daytime, then works from four to twelve. Sundays half a day. Gets $5.00 a week. “I take medicines to the Red Light places several times a day. Yes I know some of the people there.” This is a pretty heavy burden, both physical and moral, to place on this adolescent boy. Location: San Antonio, Texas. 1913
messenger telegraph boys photo
For nine years this sixteen year old boy has been newsboy and messenger for drug stores and telegraph companies. He was recently brought before the Judge of the Juvenile Court for incorrigibility at home. Is now out on parole, and was working again for drug company when he got a job carrying grips in the Union Depot. He is on the job from 6:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. (seventeen hours a day) for seven days in the week. His mother and the judge think he uses cocaine, and yet they let him put in these long hours every day. He told me “There ain’t a house in ‘The Acre’ (Red Light) that I ain’t been in. At the drug store, all my deliveries were down there.” Says he makes from $15.00 to $18.00 a week. Eugene Dalton. Location: Fort Worth

17 Old Photos of People Eating Ice Cream Pictures & Classic Ice Cream Truck

Farm boys eating ice-cream cones. Washington, Indiana

These old eating ice cream pictures and photos of the classic ice cream truck will have you smacking your lips!

The ice cream girl

Eating ice cream pictures, 1913

Eating German ice cream
Eating German ice cream, 1930
Ice cream social, Blackduck, Minnesota
Eating ice cream picture: Ice cream social, Blackduck, Minnesota, 1937
Fussell-Young Ice Cream Co., trucks
Classic ice cream truck, the Fussell-Young Ice Cream Co., trucks, 1921
Syracuse ice cream vendor, New York
Syracuse ice cream vendor, New York, 1941
Ice cream advertising near Berlin, Connecticut
Ice cream advertising near Berlin, Connecticut, 1939
Harvey Isaac’s Ice cream parlor & trolley station, Chapman Beach, Conn., 1910
Classic ice cream truck, the Reid Ice Cream Co. truck, probably in Washington, D.C., 1919
["Soda jerk" passing ice cream soda between two soda fountains
Eating ice cream pictures: Soda jerk” passing ice cream soda between two soda fountains, 1936

Washington, D.C. Good Humor ice cream truck
Classic ice cream truck, Washington, D.C. Good Humor truck, 1942
Semmes Motor Co. Fussel Ice Cream truck, [1926] En
Semmes Motor Co. Fussel Ice Cream truck, [1926]
Women selling ice cream to parade watchers, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1938
Women selling ice cream to parade watchers, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1938
Bethlehem-Fairfield shipyards, Baltimore, Maryland. A welder eating ice cream, 1943
Bethlehem-Fairfield shipyards, Baltimore, Maryland. A welder eating ice cream, 1943
Farm boys eating ice-cream cones. Washington, Indiana
Farm boys eating ice-cream cones. Washington, Indiana, 1941

Model of ice cream cone in front of candy store, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin
Model of ice cream cone in front of candy store, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, 1937

Rare Vintage Pictures of Protesters

Protesters with signs: "Johnson unfair to labor," "Reinstate Donovan," etc.

These vintage pictures of protesters show individuals voicing their objections to a variety of issues that included woman’s suffrage, political imprisonments, World War II, food for the poor, employment and Native land issues.

pictures of protesters
War Protestors 1940

 

pictures of protesters
Food protests – East siders in food protest, New York, 1917
pictures of protesters
Irish Demonstration 1920
pictures of protesters
Members of the Group of women who staged a demonstration in the galeries of the House of Representatives urging freedon [sic] for Ireland and were forcibly ejected from the House. Left to Right, Miss Mary Ferrick, Malden Mass. Miss Kathlene Savage, Everett Mass., Miss Helen O’Brien Boston Mass. Standing Miss Kathlene O’Brennan, San Francisco Cal., Miss Mary M. Duffy Newark, N.J., 1920
Protesting Political Impisoments, 1905, Washington, D.C.
Protesting Political Impisoments, 1905, Washington, D.C.
Protest meeting in Berlin, 1923
Protest meeting in Berlin, 1923

 

Pueblos bring first protest since Lincoln
Four Pueblo men (l to r) Santiago Naranjo, Waihusing, James Miller, and Jesus Baca, standing, facing front, wearing traditional and western clothing, each wearing a blanket and carrying a cane given them by Abraham Lincoln as a token of promise of permanent retention of their lands. 1923
Suffragists Protest Woodrow Wilson's Opposition to Woman Suffrage, October 1916
Suffragists Protest Woodrow Wilson’s Opposition to Woman Suffrage, October 1916

 

Protesters with signs: "Johnson unfair to labor," "Reinstate Donovan," etc.
Protesters with signs: “Johnson unfair to labor,” “Reinstate Donovan,” etc., 1934

Rare Vintage Photos of Presidential Inaugurations

Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]

Rare presidential inaugurations photos starting with 1869 and the inauguration of U.S. president Grant.

Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations- Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]
Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol 1877. March 4, 1877 fell on Sunday, so Hayes privately took oath of office on Saturday, March 3, in the White House Red Room to ensure peaceful transition of power; the public Inauguration was on Monday, March 5.
Presidential Inaugurations
President Garfield in reviewing stand, viewing inauguration ceremonies, March 4, 1881
Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller administering the oath  to Benjamin Harrison on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1889
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon [i.e. Edward J. Stellwagen], Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman--A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman–A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies. 1909
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Presidential Inaugurations – Oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929
Presidential Inaugurations – Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929

 

Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949
Presidential Inaugurations – Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949

 

Old Photos of Elevated Trains in New York City

A curve on the elevated railroad, N.Y., 1895

These old photos of elevated trains in New York City show how vital there were and are to a densely populated city where it wasn’t practical to have a lot of automobiles.

The earliest elevated railway was the London and Greenwich Railway on a brick viaduct of 878 arches, built between 1836 and 1838. The first 2.5 miles  of the London and Blackwall Railway (1840) was also on a viaduct. During the 1840s there were other schemes for elevated railways in London which did not come to fruition.

From the late 1860s elevated railways became popular in US cities. The New York West Side and Yonkers Patent Railway operated with cable cars from 1868 to 1870, thereafter locomotive-hauled. This was followed by the Manhattan Railway in 1875, the South Side Elevated Railroad, Chicago (1892–), and the elevated lines of the Boston Elevated Railway (1901–). The Chicago transit system itself is known as “L”, short for “elevated”. In Europe the Berlin Stadtbahn (1882) and the Vienna Stadtbahn (1898) were also mainly elevated systems.

The first electric elevated railway was the Liverpool Overhead Railway, which operated through Liverpool docks from 1893 until 1956.

In London, the Docklands Light Railway is a modern elevated railway that opened in 1987 and, since, has expanded. The trains are driverless and automatic. Another modern elevated railway is Tokyo’s driverless Yurikamome line, opened in 1995.

A curve on the elevated railroad, N.Y., 1895

A curve on the elevated railroad, N.Y., 1895

The Elevated, New York, 1900
The Elevated, New York, 1900
Photograph shows the express tracks of the Ninth Avenue El (elevated railroad) in New York City. The Silas Herring Building at 669 Hudson Street at 14th Street is in background at right. The new configuration for express trains was done as part of a system upgrade from 1914-1915.
Photograph shows the express tracks of the Ninth Avenue El (elevated railroad) in New York City. The Silas Herring Building at 669 Hudson Street at 14th Street is in background at right. The new configuration for express trains was done as part of a system upgrade from 1914-1915.
View looking under elevated railroad, Greenwich Street, New York., 1934
View looking under elevated railroad, Greenwich Street, New York., 1934
[New York City: Morningside Park & Cathedral Heights - showing elevated railroad. Cathedral constr. in background, 1902
[New York City: Morningside Park & Cathedral Heights – showing elevated railroad. Cathedral constr. in background, 1902
Herald Square elevated railroad and Sixth Avenue near 34th Street, New York, N.Y., 1910
Herald Square elevated railroad and Sixth Avenue near 34th Street, New York, N.Y., 1910
Thirty-Fourth St. & Sixth Ave. S.E. corner, 1910
Thirty-Fourth St. & Sixth Ave. S.E. corner, 1910
Elevated railroad station, Chatham Square, New York City, 1880
Elevated railroad station, Chatham Square, New York City, 1880
Elevated railroads in New York City: in the Bowery, 1896
Elevated railroads in New York City: in the Bowery, 1896
Elevated railroad at 110th St., N.Y., 1904
Elevated railroad at 110th St., N.Y., 1904
Elevated railroad in New York City, possibly 110th St., 1896
Elevated railroad in New York City, possibly 110th St., 1896

Funny 1914 Cartoon Shows Father Trying To Loose Weight

Vintage cartoon of exercising 1914

It’s that time of year, again, when millions of Americans resolve to loose weight. The following cartoons, sketched in pencil by the artist Arthur Burdett, show a father trying to loose weight while being interrupted by family members. This cartoon was created in 1914.

An overweight man stretches his arms above his head, bending slightly, as his bewildered daughter watches from the doorway of the room.
An overweight man does floor exercises, lying on his back and raising his legs, as a elderly woman with glasses looks critically in the room as she opens the door.
An overweight man does bending exercises, as a woman watches horrified, from the doorway of the room
An overweight man jumps rope, burying his mouth in the neck of his shirt, as a surprised male servant watches from the doorway of the room.
An overweight man exercises, stretching his arms out to his sides and bending one leg forward, and grimaces as his wife watches with a surprised expression from the doorway of the room.
An overweight man, apparently annoyed with constant interference, closes the door to the room.

10 Rare Old Photos of New York’s Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building, is a triangular 22-story steel-framed landmark building located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, and is considered to be a groundbreaking skyscraper. Upon completion in 1902, it was one of the tallest buildings in the city at 20 floors high.

Flatiron Building, 1903, one year after it was built.
New York, N.Y., Flatiron Bldg. from Madison Square Park, 1902
New York, N.Y., Flatiron Bldg. from Madison Square Park, 1902
Looking down on the Flatiron Building from Metropolitan Tower Summary Stereograph showing an elevated view looking down on the Flatiron Building in New York City and the activity on the streets below. 1915
Looking down on the Flatiron Building from Metropolitan Tower
Stereograph showing an elevated view looking down on the Flatiron Building in New York City and the activity on the streets below. 1915
Flatiron Building, New York, N.Y., 1902
Flatiron Building, New York, N.Y., 1902
[Flatiron building under construction, New York City
Flatiron building under construction, New York City, 1902
Flatiron building under construction, New York City, 1902
Flatiron building under construction, New York City, 1902
Flatiron Building, New York City, 1980
Flatiron Building and view of Fifth Avenue, 1909
View of the Flatiron Building, showing pedestrians, carriages, trolley and mounted policeman on street., 1905
View of the Flatiron Building, showing pedestrians, carriages, trolley and mounted policeman on street., 1905
View of the Flatiron building showing pedestrians and vehicular traffic on streets., 1910
View of the Flatiron building showing pedestrians and vehicular traffic on streets., 1910