Amazing Colorized Photos of discovery of Tutankhamun in 1922

During the early twentieth century, Howard Carter, a British Egyptologist, excavated for many years in the Valley of the Kings—a royal burial ground located on the west bank of the ancient city of Thebes, Egypt. When Carter arrived in Egypt in 1891, he became convinced there was at least one undiscovered tomb–that of the little known Tutankhamen, or King Tut, who lived around 1400 B.C. and died when he was still a teenager. Backed by a rich Brit, Lord Carnarvon, Carter searched for five years without success. In early 1922, Lord Carnarvon wanted to call off the search, but Carter convinced him to hold on one more year.

Finally the wait paid off when Carter came upon the first of twelve steps of the entrance that led to the tomb of Tutankhamun. He quickly recovered the steps and sent a telegram to Carnarvon in England so they could open the tomb together. Carnarvon departed for Egypt immediately and on November 26, 1922, they made a hole in the entrance of the antechamber in order to look in.

Tutankhamun’s burial mask.
Tutankhamun’s burial mask.

 

Chests inside the treasury.
Chests inside the treasury.

Carter recalled: “At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the lights, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold –everywhere the glint of gold”.

When Carter and Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb’s interior chambers on November 26, they were thrilled to find it virtually intact, with its treasures untouched after more than 3,000 years. The men began exploring the four rooms of the tomb, and on February 16, 1923, under the watchful eyes of a number of important officials, Carter opened the door to the last chamber.

Inside lay a sarcophagus with three coffins nested inside one another. The last coffin, made of solid gold, contained the mummified body of King Tut. Among the riches found in the tomb–golden shrines, jewelry, statues, a chariot, weapons, clothing–the perfectly preserved mummy was the most valuable, as it was the first one ever to be discovered.

Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.

 

Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus held not one but three coffins in which to hold the body of the king. The outer two coffins were crafted in wood and covered in gold along with many semiprecious stones, such as lapis lazuli and turquoise. The inner coffin, however, was made of solid gold. When Howard Carter first came upon this coffin, it was not the shiny golden image we see in the Egyptian museum today. In his excavation notes, Carter states, it was “covered with a thick black pitch-like layer which extended from the hands down to the ankles. This was obviously an anointing liquid which had been poured over the coffin during the burial ceremony and in great quantity (some two buckets full)”.

 

An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.
An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.

The tomb was robbed at least twice in antiquity, but based on the items taken (including perishable oils and perfumes) and the evidence of restoration of the tomb after the intrusions, it seems clear that these robberies took place within several months at most of the initial burial.

Eventually, the location of the tomb was lost because it had come to be buried by stone chips from subsequent tombs, either dumped there or washed there by floods. In the years that followed, some huts for workers were built over the tomb entrance, clearly without anyone’s knowing what lay beneath. When at the end of the 20th Dynasty the Valley of the Kings burial sites were systematically dismantled, Tutankhamun’s tomb was overlooked, presumably because knowledge of it had been lost, and his name may have been forgotten.

 

Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.
Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.

n total 5,398 items were found in the tomb, including a solid gold coffin, face mask, thrones, archery bows, trumpets, a lotus chalice, food, wine, sandals, and fresh linen underwear. Howard Carter took 10 years to catalog the items. Recent analysis suggests a dagger recovered from the tomb had an iron blade made from a meteorite; study of artifacts of the time including other artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb could provide valuable insights into metalworking technologies around the Mediterranean at the time.

For many years, rumors of a “Curse of the Pharaohs” (probably fueled by newspapers seeking sales at the time of the discovery) persisted, emphasizing the early death of some of those who had entered the tomb. A study showed that of the 58 people who were present when the tomb and sarcophagus were opened, only eight died within a dozen years. All the others were still alive, including Howard Carter, who died of lymphoma in 1939 at the age of 64. The last survivor, American archaeologist J.O. Kinnaman, died in 1961, a full 39 years after the event.

 

A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.

(Via rarehistoricalphotos)(Photo credit: Harry Burton, The Griffith Institute, Oxford. Colorized by Dynamichrome for the exhibition “The Discovery of King Tut” in New York).

10 Vintage Photos of Old London Pubs

The Tiger, Prince Street Deptford London, SE8

These 10 vintage photos of old London Pubs show this important public institution at its quintessential best.

A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic drinks, which traditionally include beer (such as ale) and cider. It is a relaxed, social drinking establishment and a prominent part of British, Irish, New Zealand, Canadian, South African and Australian cultures. In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. In his 17th-century diary Samuel Pepys described the pub as “the heart of England”.

 

Rock of Gibraltar and the Globe Pubs Deptford SE8 Early 1900s
View of Evelyn Street, Deptford in the early 20th Century. Two pubs shown here, the Globe in its original form, the modern building can be seen here although it’s now a betting shop www.flickr.com/photos/matt1965/3185734237/in/album-721576… and on the left is the Rock of Gibraltar or Old Gibraltar. The Globe appears on the 1951 OS map but the site of the Gibraltar is empty, propbably another victim of the war time bombing.

 

Merry Cricketers, Deptford, SE8
276 Lower Road, Deptford, London, SE8.
Closed for many years, now a convenience store.

 

The Ship and Billet, Greenwich, London, SE10
The Ship and Billet pub, 1 Woolwich Road, Greenwich, London, SE10.
Still open and currently called the Duchess.
Chichester Arms, Deptford. 89 Evelyn Street, Deptford, London, SE8.
The Road layout in this area has changed completely since this pub existed. It’s shown on the 1895 ordinance survey map as being on the junction of Evelyn Street and Windmill Lane, now gone. It stood over the road from Scawen Road which does still exist. On the 1951 ordinance survey map the site is shown as empty which would indicate the pub suffered damage during the war.
The Old Mill, plumstead Common, London SE18.
The Old Mill, plumstead Common, London SE18., Circa 1905
Dog and Duck Rotherhithe SE16
Dog and Duck Rotherhithe SE16
Located on Commercial Dock Passage, it was destroyed by a V2 bomb on 31 October 1944.
The Tiger, Prince Street Deptford London, SE8
The Tiger, Prince Street Deptford London, SE8
The Tiger stood at 64 Prince Street. This old London pub can be dated to pre- 1933 when Hoare & Co were brought out by Carringtons. They stopped brewing on the 23rd June 1934.This pub is shown on an 1895 OS map but by 1951 it was gone and what looks like prefabs are shown on the map so it can be assumed it suffered from the bombing during the war and was demolished. It stood on the junction of Prince Street and modern Czar Street.

 

The Vulcan Brunswick Street, Poplar, London
The Vulcan Brunswick Street, Poplar, London
This picture of this old London pub can be dated to the early part of the 20th century. An OS map of 1895 shows that Bedford Street wasn’t connected to Brunswick Street (Not Brunswick Road which is also shown on the early maps). By 1916 Bedford road had been extended and by 1950 it had changed name to Ditchburn street, the name of which still exists today. The whole area was redeveloped and many of the roads have now vanished.

 

The Red Lion Borough High Street London SE1

The Red Lion Borough High Street London SE1
The Red Lion was on the corner of Great Suffolk Street and Borough High Street. This picture shows a completely different old London pub to the current building, renamed “Ruse” which I believe is now closed. strangely it appears the new building incorporates a couple of the old buildings windows.

The Vine Tavern
The Vine Tavern, a vanished East London landmark, circa 1890s.

(Via Flickr)

Old Color Photos of Native Americans

As a filmmaker, Paul Ratner is drawn to old color photos of Native Americans. His first love of film came from old black and white movies by world cinema auteurs like the jarring works of Bergman, Eisenstein, Bunuel, Lang, Dreyer, Ozu and other great masters. For a while in college, he felt it was almost like cheating to watch a film made in color. As Ratner grew older, heaccepted color and now finds it hard to stick to a monochrome diet. Life seems too resplendent for just one tone, he notes.

While making Moses on the Mesa, a film about a German-Jewish immigrant who fell in love with a Native-American woman and became governor of her tribe of Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico in the late 1800s, Ratner developed a passion for researching old photographs of indigenous people. They were black and white photos of a beautiful mystical people, and it felt inconceivable that anyone would want to exterminate them from this continent as a conscious policy stretching over hundreds of years. It just seemed so barbaric and inhumane. Delving deeper into the research, he started coming across colorized photos of these first Americans. In them the people started to come to life even more. Looking at them he sees regular people but also royalty. They are in a way no different than historical portraits of European kings, queens and nobility. Except that not only do they show majestic regalia, but also strong, natural faces rather than the weak, powdered gazes of the often-interbred rulers from across the ocean that brought their demise.

Many of the photographs Ratner found were colored by hand, as color film was only the domain of experimentalists until 1930s (thanks, Kodachrome!) Painting on black and white prints was an art in and of itself, and many of the colorized photos exhibit true talent which preserved for us the truer likeness of the people many a hundred years ago thought were vanishing. Of course, Native Americans have not vanished despite the harrowing efforts of so many. They are growing stronger as a people, but a way of life they left behind is often only found in these photos.

Handpainted print of a young woman by the river. Early 1900s. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
“In Summer”. Kiowa. 1898. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Source – Boston Public Library
Geronimo (Goyaałé). Apache. 1898. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Omaha, Nebraska. Source – Boston Public Library.
Blackfeet tribal camp with grazing horses. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
Bone Necklace. Oglala Lakota Chief. 1899. Photo by Heyn Photo. Source – Library of Congress.
Charles American Horse (the son of Chief American Horse). Oglala Lakota. 1901. Photo by William Herman Rau. Source – Princeton Digital Library.
Cheyenne Chief Wolf Robe. Color halftone reproduction of a painting from a F. A. Rinehart photograph. 1898. Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
A Crow dancer. Early 1900s. Photo by Richard Throssel. Source – University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center.
Amos Two Bulls. Lakota. Photo by Gertrude Käsebier. 1900. Source – Library of Congress.
A medicine man with patient. Taos Pueblo, New Mexico. 1905. Photo by Carl Moon. Source – Huntington Digital Library.
Chief Little Wound and family. Oglala Lakota. 1899. Photo by Heyn Photo. Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
Eagle Arrow. A Siksika man. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
Handpainted print depicting five riders going downhill in Montana. Early 1900s. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science .
Strong Left Hand and family. Northern Cheyenne Reservation. 1906. Photo by Julia Tuell. Source – Buzz Tuell, Tuell Pioneer Photography.
Piegan men giving prayer to the Thunderbird near a river in Montana. 1912. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
Old Coyote (aka Yellow Dog). Crow. Original photo circa 1879 (color tinted circa 1910). Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
Thunder Tipi of Brings-Down-The-Sun. Blackfoot camp. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

These old color photos of Native Americans bring to life the rich detail of their clothing and jewelry.

Arrowmaker, an Ojibwe man. 1903. Photochrom print by the Detroit Photographic Co. Source – Library of Congress.
Acoma pueblo. New Mexico. Early 1900s. Photo by Chicago Transparency Company. Source – Palace of the Governors Archives. New Mexico History Museum.

These old color photos of Native Americans were originally printed in black and white.

“Songlike”, a Pueblo man, 1899. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Source – Boston Public Library.
Northern Plains man on an overlook. Montana. Early 1900s. Hand-colored photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

Old color photos of Native Americans

(Via Huffington Post)

30 Photos of Beautiful Abandoned Places and Ghost Towns

These beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns were photographed by American photographer Charles W. Cushman whose thousands of photographs are now held by the Indiana University Archives.  Most of these photos of abandoned builds and American ghosts towns were taken by him in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  They provided a living legacy of a past that has now long since disappeared.

Beautiful Abandoned Places and Ghost Towns

beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns
Old store building Bloomfield California, August 31, 1964.
beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns
Old house in Virginia City, September 29, 1962.
beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns
Marin county near San Quentin- hill back of old Greenbrae Shake Mill, California. October 6, 1961.
East up O’Farrell from Buchanan, San Francisco
East up O’Farrell from Buchanan, San Francisco, October 16, 1960.
NW corner of Gough & Ellis Sts. San Francisco, August 2, 1959.
beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns
Old Fortmann mansion in Gough at Eddy, after fire – S.E. corner
beautiful abandoned places and ghost towns
Old Fortmann mansion in Gough at Eddy, after fire, San Francisco. July 26, 1959.
4400 Grand Blvd. Chicago. Burned out. November 23, 1958.
Old Movie set Snow’s Canyon SW Utah
Old Movie set in Snow’s Canyon SW Utah near St. George, April 28, 1958.
Ghost towns in Nevada, October 9, 1954.
Open house in Owens Valley below the high White Mtns. – the highest, 14242 ft. is With Mtn. Peak
Skeleton concrete home on US 6 North of Bishop. September 17, 1954.

American ghost towns, Jerome, Arizona.
View of Jerome, Arizona – once a prosperous copper mining town. November 21, 1953.
Leadville, Colo. Gutted store-but padlocked, October 13, 1953.
Ruins at top of hill in east section of Leadville, Colorado. Sunday morning, November 2, 1952.
Central City, Colorado, October 31, 1952.
The upper outskirts of Blackhawk, Colorado, October 31, 1952.
All that remains of the college of Vincennes Founded in 1837, Indiana, November 29, 1951.
Cicero Apt. bldg at 19th and Lombard, boarded up after summer race riots. Cicero, Illinois. October 11, 1951.
Burned-out Tenement, Chicago, March 7, 1951.
Burned-out Tenement, n.e. corner 31st & Indiana Ave., Chicago, March 7, 1951.
Old brick house at 1309 Peoria ( south ), Chicago, March 4, 1949.
Old Otis Home, 1709 Prairie Avenue, Chicago. August 12, 1941
Gold Hill Nevada, 1940.
Ghost towns in Nevada. Gold Hill, 1940.
Ghost towns in Nevada. Gold Hill, July 8, 1940.

Cushman’s photos of New York street scenes is also very fascinating.

19 Bizarre Old Photos of Women and Guns

women and guns photo

These 19 old photos of women and guns show that American’s have a long and bizarre obsession with this instrument of death. There is something quite disturbing about a women or anyone for that matter, who cracks a big smile for the camera as they pose with their favourite rifle.  Guns are known to blow holes in people’s heads, but oh what a great fashion accessory they make!

 

women and guns photo
Maryland woman takes skeet shooting title. Westmoreland Hills, MD. Jan. 5. Mrs. Albert F. Walker of this town has been declared 1937 women’s skeet shooting champion of the country by the National Skeet Shooting Association. The Association has released the averages on which the ratings were based, but one day last year at the Kenwood, MD, skeet club, Mrs. Walker set the woman’s record fall with 99×100 (skeet for 99 birds out of a possible 100). In addition to her national title, she outranks both men and women shooters in the District of Columbia and Maryland, 1/5/38
women and guns photo
women and guns
women and guns photo
A sure shot, 1910
women and guns photo
1911 cartoon shows a woman, possibly Coco Chanel, wearing a large hat with feathers, shooting at large white birds with a rifle; two dogs labeled “French Milliner” place the dead birds on a pile at her feet.
women and guns photo
Woman policeman with gun feigning arrest of a man, 1900
women and guns photo
The .25 caliber Colt advertisement, 1912
women and guns photo
women and guns – seated at table, inspecting 45 automatic pistol parts, at Colt’s Patent Fire Arms Plant, Hartford, Connecticut, 1914
women and guns photo
Woman in cowgirl clothing, seated at table with deck of cards and chips, pointing pistol, with arm on table. 1912
women and guns photo
The moonshiner’s daughter, 1901
women and guns photo
Blanche Rogers with pistol, 1910
women and guns photo
Grace Stockman of Natl. Museum with Andrew Jackson pistols, 1926
women and guns photo
Miss Grace Stockman with President Andrew Jackson’s dueling pistols, at the National Museum , 1926
women and guns photo
Training a policewoman–target practice under the direction of Inspector Cross of the police department–Inspector Cross demonstrates the correct way to hold a “gat” , 1909
women and guns photo
In the field, 1876
women and guns photo
Photograph shows occupational portrait of taxidermist Martha A. Maxwell with animal specimens, palette, and rifle. 1876
women and guns photo
women and guns – Washington Univ. Girls Rifle Team, 1927
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley, with gun Buffalo Bill gave her, 1922
women and guns photo
Annie Oakley – famous rifle shot and holder of the Police Gazette championship medal, 1899
women and guns photo
Mary Agnes Shanley, New York City detective, half-length portrait, facing left, pulling a pistol out of her handbag, 1937

Celebrate Woman’s History Month

Mrs. Ellen A. O'Grady Summary Photograph shows Ellen O'Grady, the first female police commissioner in New York

Mrs. Ellen A. O’Grady Summary Photograph shows Ellen O’Grady, the first female police commissioner in New York

Women’s History Month is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8, and during October in Canada, corresponding with the celebration of Persons Day on October 18.

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Rare Gory Civil War Photographs

Gettysburg, Pa. Confederate dead at the edge of the Rose woods, July 5, 1863] Summary Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Gettysburg, June-July, 1863. Contributor Names Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer Created / Published 1863 July [5]

Gory civil war photographs are part of the many fascinating images from this important historical event.

Manassas, Virginia. Confederate winter quarters
Manassas, Virginia. Confederate winter quarters, 1862
Washington, District of Columbia. Buildings destroyed by great fire where Col. Ellsworth's Zouaves distinguished themselves Created / Published [between 1861 and 1869]
Washington, District of Columbia. Buildings destroyed by great fire where Col. Ellsworth’s Zouaves distinguished themselves. Created between 1861 and 1869
Gettysburg, Pa. Three Confederate prisoners] Summary Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Gettysburg, June-July, 1863. Created / Published 1863 July.
Gettysburg, Pa. Three Confederate prisoners
Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Gettysburg, June-July, 1863.
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Dead Confederate sharpshooter at the foot of Round Top Contributor Names Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer Created / Published 1863 July.
Gory civil war photographs showing Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Dead Confederate sharpshooter at the foot of Round Top. Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer, Created 1863 July
Gettysburg, Pa. Confederate dead at the edge of the Rose woods, July 5, 1863] Summary Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Gettysburg, June-July, 1863. Contributor Names Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer Created / Published 1863 July [5]
Gory civil war photographs showing Gettysburg, Pa. Confederate dead at the edge of the Rose woods, July 5, 1863. Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, Gettysburg, June-July, 1863.
Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882, photographer

Group at transportation office, Aquia Creek, Va. Contributor Names O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882, photographer Created / Published Feb. 1863.
Group at transportation office, Aquia Creek, Va.
Feb. 1863
Port Royal Island, S.C. Coosaw Ferry; battleground of January 1, 1862, in the distance] Summary Photograph of the Federal Navy, and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy, specifically of Port Royal, S.C., 1861-1862. Contributor Names O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882, photographer Created / Published [1862]
Port Royal Island, S.C. Coosaw Ferry; battleground of January 1, 1862, in the distance
Photograph of the Federal Navy, and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy, specifically of Port Royal, S.C., 1861-1862.
Aquia Creek, Virginia. Captain J.W. Forsyth, the Provost Marshall
Created 1863 Feb
Culpeper, Virginia. Colonel Wood and friends Contributor Names O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882, photographer Created / Published 1863 Nov.
Culpeper, Virginia. Colonel Wood and friends
O’Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882, photographer, Created  1863 Nov.
Soldiers' Cemetery, Alexandria, Virginia
Soldiers’ Cemetery, Alexandria, Virginia, 1861
Cumberland Landing, Virginia. Federal encampment on the Pamunkey River
Cumberland Landing, Virginia. Federal encampment on the Pamunkey River, 1862
Cumberland Landing, Virginia. Federal encampment on Pamunkey
Cumberland Landing, Virginia. Federal encampment on Pamunkey, 1862
Fort Fisher, North Carolina. Gun with muzzle shot away
Fort Fisher, North Carolina. Gun with muzzle shot away, January 1865
Washington, District of Columbia. Grand review of the army
Washington, District of Columbia. Grand review of the army, May 1865
Brandy Station, Virginia. Major William Riddle and friends. Headquarters, Army of the Potomac Contributor Names O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882, photographer Created / Published 1864 Apr.
Brandy Station, Virginia. Major William Riddle and friends. Headquarters, Army of the Potomac
1864 Apr.
Beaufort, S.C. Gen. Isaac I. Stevens (seated) and staff on porch of a house
Beaufort, S.C. Gen. Isaac I. Stevens (seated) and staff on porch of a house

Photograph of the Federal Navy, and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy, specifically of Port Royal, S.C., 1861-1862.

Ambulance Corps. Method of removing wounded from the fieldRare gory civil war photographs showing Ambulance Corps. Method of removing wounded from the field, 1861

Washington, District of Columbia. Officers of 3d Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery
Washington, District of Columbia. Officers of 3d Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 1865
Drewry's Bluff, Virginia. Federal transports with cargoes of artillery on the James
Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia. Federal transports with cargoes of artillery on the James, April 1865

Rare Vintage Photos of Presidential Inaugurations

Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]

Rare presidential inaugurations photos starting with 1869 and the inauguration of U.S. president Grant.

Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations- Inauguration of President U.S. Grant [March 4, 1869]
Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite administering the oath of office to Rutherford B. Hayes on a flag-draped inaugural stand on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol 1877. March 4, 1877 fell on Sunday, so Hayes privately took oath of office on Saturday, March 3, in the White House Red Room to ensure peaceful transition of power; the public Inauguration was on Monday, March 5.
Presidential Inaugurations
President Garfield in reviewing stand, viewing inauguration ceremonies, March 4, 1881
Presidential Inaugurations
Presidential Inaugurations – Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller administering the oath  to Benjamin Harrison on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1889
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon [i.e. Edward J. Stellwagen], Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman--A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies
President Taft is here photographed with Edward F. Stallwagon Chief of the Inaugural Committee, and with Vice President James S. Sherman–A severe blizzard hindered the ceremonies. 1909
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Presidential Inaugurations – Oath of office to Calvin Coolidge on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1925
Chief Justice William H. Taft administering the oath of office to Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929
Presidential Inaugurations – Herbert Hoover on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, March 4, 1929

 

Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949
Presidential Inaugurations – Inauguration of Harry S. Truman, 1949

 

Rare Old Vintage Baseball Cards from 1887s

vintage photo baseball cards 1887

Old vintage baseball cards were first issued during the 1880s when tobacco companies used them to promote sales. Although they also served periodically to stiffen soft cigarette packages, advertising was their primary function, for as early as 1887 cards and cigarettes were packed in more rigid “slide and shell” boxes which had no need for reinforcement. Although the cards vary in design and format, most are 2 5/8 x 1 1/2 inches, much smaller than today’s trading cards. Two exceptions are the large format sets of Turkey Red Cabinets and Old Judge Cabinets, produced as premiums in exchange for coupons distributed in cigarette packs (see information about the card sets in chronological order). Issued either as black-and-white photographs or color prints, the cards portray ballplayers both in action scenes and formal poses.

Great pitchers from the period include Cy Young, Walter Johnson, Christy Mathewson, Smoky Joe Wood, Chief Bender, Joe McGinnity, Eddie Plank, Rube Marquard, and Rube Waddell, among others. Hall of Fame field players include King Kelly, Cap Anson, Home Run Baker, Dan Brouthers, Ed Delahanty, Eddie Collins, Buck Ewing, Wee Willie Keeler, Napoleon Lajoie, and Zack Wheat. Researchers may also find notable player partnerships, such as the immortal Cubs infield trio of Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance or the talented Red Sox outfield comprised of Tris Speaker, Duffy Lewis, and Harry Hooper. Connie Mack, John McGraw, and Charles Comiskey are among the game’s outstanding early managers depicted.

Charles Comiskey
O’Rourke, Catcher, New York
Johnston, Centre Field, Boston
old vintage baseball cards
John M. Ward

Donnelly, Third Base, Washington
Donohue, Catcher, Mets, New York
Notice he doesn’t have a catcher’s mitt! Andrews, Fielder, Philadelphia
Wood, Left Field, Philadelphia
Fogerty, Right Field, Philadelphia
old vintage baseball cards
Kilroy, Pitcher, Baltimore

old vintage baseball cards

If you liked this collection of old vintage baseball cards check out these vintage tobacco cards.

Bizarre Vintage Circus Posters Of Clowns And Strange Acts

Circus poster showing Louise Hilton perched on a white horse, about to leap over a scarf held by a clown and a ringmaster.

Vintage circus posters from the turn-of-century were colourful pieces of artwork one could easily hang on their wall today.

Circus poster showing Louise Hilton perched on a white horse, about to leap over a scarf held by a clown and a ringmaster, 1920 vintage circus posters.
The human canon ball
The human canon ball, 1879
Aerial balloon performance with tents and audience below, 1870
Five celebrated clowns attached to Sands, Nathans Co’s Circus, 1856
Circus poster for an equestrian performance showing Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, 1892e
Circus poster showing the “Great Jumbo’s Skeleton” on a pedestal with several spectators; includes a cameo portrait of P.T. Barnum, 1888.
French circus poster shows two performers in the basket of an airship navigated by a rudder and a propeller. The basket bears the date 1884.
The Barnum & Bailey greatest show on earth Breath-taking Japanese slide for life. Circus poster showing a Japanese tight-rope walker descending a steeply angled wire, 1898
Cirque dʹhiver … Tous les soirs,à 8 heures / Stafford & Co., Nottingham.
French circus poster shows an aerialist floating with arms outstretched above a city skyline with a balloon in the background, 1880
The great Wallace shows An innovation in aerialism, the triple revolving trapeze of the sisters Vortex, 1899
The Barnum & Bailey greatest show on earth The world’s largest, grandest, best amusement institution / / The Strobridge Lith. Co., Cinti & New York. Circus poster showing trapeze artists, 1896
The Barnum & Bailey greatest show on earth Scenes in the grand water circus, 1895
Gala puppet circus Clowns, cowboys, acrobats, animals, and novelty acts, 1936
Sells Floto circus M’lle Beeson, a marvelous high wire Venus, 1921
Al. G. Field Greater Minstrels oldest 23rd year, best, 1908
The ballooon girl a comedy drama of circus life by Robert J. Sherman : not a moving picture., 1900
The ballooon girl a comedy drama of circus life by Robert J. Sherman : not a moving picture, 1900
The Barnum & Bailey greatest show on earth. The marvelous foot-ball dogs / Strobridge Litho. Co., Cincinnati & New York, 1900
Circus Peacock 1895
Sells Brothers enormous united shows. … The wonderful Snow White … zebu and riding peacock, 1895 vintage circus posters.
Poster showing the clown Crandall performing with his mule, and small portraits of Crandall and of the Ringling brothers, 1899
Adam Forepaugh & Sells Brothers great shows consolidated A congress of the giant birds of the world, 1898 vintage circus posters.
The great Wallace shows: colossal 3 ring circus, 2 elevated stages. Poster shows Robert Stickney, Jr. performing a back flip on a galloping horse as a clown watches. Also shown on poster are portraits of Stickney and circus owner B.E. Wallace, 1898
5 Circus Clowns, 1890
5 Circus Clowns, 1890 vintage circus posters