Rare Photos of Showing Brutal Life of North Koreans During Winter of 1973

These rare photos of North Korea, were taken in 1973 by British Photographer John Bulmer and published in the British Sunday Times. North Korea was even more isolated during this period than it currently is.

School boys listening to a museum tour guide
School boys listening to a museum tour guide
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
Kim IlSung's portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim IlSung’s portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
School children walking along the Pyongyang People's Palace
School children walking along the Pyongyang People’s Palace
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung's birthplace.
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung’s birthplace.
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea. Notice that there are no locals milling about.
Girls in Pyongyang City.
Girls in Pyongyang City.

Photos of of Pimps, Prostitutes and Homeless from 1970s Times Square Through a Bartender’s Camera

In 1972 Shelly Nadelman began a ten-year run bartending at one of New York City’s most notorious dives: the Terminal Bar, located across the street from the Port Authority Bus Terminal near Times Square.

For ten years, right up until the bar closed for good in 1982, he shot thousands of black and white photographs, mostly portraits of his customers— neighborhood regulars, drag queens, thrill-seeking tourists, pimps and prostitutes, midtown office workers dropping by before catching a bus home to the suburbs—all of whom found welcome and respite at the Terminal Bar.

“In the beginning it was just the regulars and they were willing and able to be photographed,” Nadelman said in an interview. “Then there were just faces that came in and I knew I wouldn’t see them again. But they looked interesting. I’d say 90 percent of the people were willing to be photographed.”
In the early 2000s, his grown son Stefan began sorting, scanning, and printing his dad’s negatives, and very quickly realized that the scene at Terminal Bar had become a historic artifact. That New York was fading fast — it was just about gone, in fact — and Sheldon Nadelman had caught it all. The images were eventually made into a book, Terminal Bar, by Princeton Architectural Press; it brings back to life the 1970s presanitized Times Square, a raucous chapter of the city that never sleeps.

Rare Colour Pictures of Seoul in 1948-49, before the Korean War

In 1945, with the surrender of the Empire of Japan in September 1945 that ended World War II, Korea was liberated from the Japanese occupation exercised since 1910. However, the peninsula was divided in two parts: the Republic of Korea (South Korea), supported by the United Nations, and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea), at one time supported by the People’s Republic of China and the Soviet Union. A few years later, in 1950, North Korea launched a surprise attack with the intention to invade South Korea and move to dominate the whole peninsula. The attack began the Korean War, a conflict that still exists today, despite the ceasefire signed in 1953.

Here’s a series of 32 awesome colour photographs of daily life in Seoul. These photos are taken in the winter, between October 1948 and March 1949.

 
























































You might find these photos of North Korean in 1980s interesting!

Amazing Colorized Photos of discovery of Tutankhamun in 1922

During the early twentieth century, Howard Carter, a British Egyptologist, excavated for many years in the Valley of the Kings—a royal burial ground located on the west bank of the ancient city of Thebes, Egypt. When Carter arrived in Egypt in 1891, he became convinced there was at least one undiscovered tomb–that of the little known Tutankhamen, or King Tut, who lived around 1400 B.C. and died when he was still a teenager. Backed by a rich Brit, Lord Carnarvon, Carter searched for five years without success. In early 1922, Lord Carnarvon wanted to call off the search, but Carter convinced him to hold on one more year.

Finally the wait paid off when Carter came upon the first of twelve steps of the entrance that led to the tomb of Tutankhamun. He quickly recovered the steps and sent a telegram to Carnarvon in England so they could open the tomb together. Carnarvon departed for Egypt immediately and on November 26, 1922, they made a hole in the entrance of the antechamber in order to look in.

Tutankhamun’s burial mask.
Tutankhamun’s burial mask.

 

Chests inside the treasury.
Chests inside the treasury.

Carter recalled: “At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the lights, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold –everywhere the glint of gold”.

When Carter and Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb’s interior chambers on November 26, they were thrilled to find it virtually intact, with its treasures untouched after more than 3,000 years. The men began exploring the four rooms of the tomb, and on February 16, 1923, under the watchful eyes of a number of important officials, Carter opened the door to the last chamber.

Inside lay a sarcophagus with three coffins nested inside one another. The last coffin, made of solid gold, contained the mummified body of King Tut. Among the riches found in the tomb–golden shrines, jewelry, statues, a chariot, weapons, clothing–the perfectly preserved mummy was the most valuable, as it was the first one ever to be discovered.

Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.

 

Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus held not one but three coffins in which to hold the body of the king. The outer two coffins were crafted in wood and covered in gold along with many semiprecious stones, such as lapis lazuli and turquoise. The inner coffin, however, was made of solid gold. When Howard Carter first came upon this coffin, it was not the shiny golden image we see in the Egyptian museum today. In his excavation notes, Carter states, it was “covered with a thick black pitch-like layer which extended from the hands down to the ankles. This was obviously an anointing liquid which had been poured over the coffin during the burial ceremony and in great quantity (some two buckets full)”.

 

An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.
An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.

The tomb was robbed at least twice in antiquity, but based on the items taken (including perishable oils and perfumes) and the evidence of restoration of the tomb after the intrusions, it seems clear that these robberies took place within several months at most of the initial burial.

Eventually, the location of the tomb was lost because it had come to be buried by stone chips from subsequent tombs, either dumped there or washed there by floods. In the years that followed, some huts for workers were built over the tomb entrance, clearly without anyone’s knowing what lay beneath. When at the end of the 20th Dynasty the Valley of the Kings burial sites were systematically dismantled, Tutankhamun’s tomb was overlooked, presumably because knowledge of it had been lost, and his name may have been forgotten.

 

Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.
Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.

n total 5,398 items were found in the tomb, including a solid gold coffin, face mask, thrones, archery bows, trumpets, a lotus chalice, food, wine, sandals, and fresh linen underwear. Howard Carter took 10 years to catalog the items. Recent analysis suggests a dagger recovered from the tomb had an iron blade made from a meteorite; study of artifacts of the time including other artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb could provide valuable insights into metalworking technologies around the Mediterranean at the time.

For many years, rumors of a “Curse of the Pharaohs” (probably fueled by newspapers seeking sales at the time of the discovery) persisted, emphasizing the early death of some of those who had entered the tomb. A study showed that of the 58 people who were present when the tomb and sarcophagus were opened, only eight died within a dozen years. All the others were still alive, including Howard Carter, who died of lymphoma in 1939 at the age of 64. The last survivor, American archaeologist J.O. Kinnaman, died in 1961, a full 39 years after the event.

 

A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.

(Via rarehistoricalphotos)(Photo credit: Harry Burton, The Griffith Institute, Oxford. Colorized by Dynamichrome for the exhibition “The Discovery of King Tut” in New York).

Rare Street vendor selling mummies in Egypt, 1865

During the Victorian era of 1800’s, Napoleon’s conquest of Egypt threw open the Gates of Egypt’s history for the Europeans. At that time, mummies were not accorded the respect that they deserved from the European elites and in fact, mummies could be purchased from street vendors (as shown in picture) to be used as the main event for parties and social gatherings that took place in the 18th century. The elites of the era would often hold “Mummy Unwrapping Parties”, which, as the name suggests, had the main theme in which a Mummy would be unwrapped in front of a boisterous audience, cheering and applauding at the same time.

During that period of time, the well-preserved remains of ancient Egyptians were routinely ground into powder and consumed as a medicinal remedy. Indeed, so popular was pulverized mummy that it even instigated a counterfeit trade to meet demand, in which the flesh of beggars was passed off as that of ancient mummified Egyptians.

As the Industrial Revolution progressed, so Egyptian mummies were exploited for more utilitarian purposes: huge numbers of human and animal mummies were ground up and shipped to Britain and Germany for use as fertilizer. Others were used to create mummy brown pigment or were stripped of their wrappings, which were subsequently exported to the US for use in the paper-making industry. The author Mark Twain even reported that mummies were burnt in Egypt as locomotive fuel.

As the nineteenth century advanced, mummies became prized objects of display and scores of them were purchased by wealthy European and American private collectors as tourist souvenirs. For those who could not afford a whole mummy, disarticulated remains – such as a head, hand or foot – could be purchased on the black market and smuggled back home.

So brisk was the trade in mummies to Europe that even after ransacking tombs and catacombs there just were not enough ancient Egyptian bodies to meet the demand. And so fake mummies were fabricated from the corpses of the executed criminals, the aged, the poor and those who had died from hideous diseases, by burying them in the sand or stuffing them with bitumen and exposing them to the sun.

Interesting facts:

  • Mummy brown was originally made in the 16th and 17th centuries from white pitch, myrrh, and the ground-up remains of Egyptian mummies, both human and feline. As it had good transparency, it could be used for glazes, shadows, flesh tones and shading. Artists believed that when bitumen and mummified flesh were used in oil paint it wouldn’t crack or dry. Mummy Brown eventually ceased being produced in its traditional form later in the 20th century when the supply of available mummies was exhausted.
  • Mummia or mummy is either a substance used in the embalming of mummies, or a powder made from ground mummies, used as a “medical preparation”. Ancient Egyptian mummy-making often utilized asphaltum (Persian: mumiya) as an ingredient for filling the empty body cavities once the organs were removed. In the Middle Ages, the resin that had been used on ancient Egyptian mummies was believed to have superior medicinal and chemical value to regular asphaltum, and the resulting demand for the ingredient caused the term to be applied to the dead bodies required to harvest it as much as to the ingredient itself.

(Via rarehistoricalphotosYou might also like: Headless Photos of the Victoria Era

14 Stunning Photos of African Americans in Chicago in the 1970s

From June through October 1973 and briefly during the spring of 1974, John H. White, a 28-year-old photographer with the Chicago Daily News, worked for the federal government photographing Chicago, especially the city`s African American community. White took his photographs for the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) DOCUMERICA project. As White reflected recently, he saw his assignment as “an opportunity to capture a slice of life, to capture history.” His photographs portray the difficult circumstances faced by many of Chicago`s African American residents in the early 1970s, but they also catch the “spirit, love, zeal, pride, and hopes of the community.”

Today, John White is a staff photographer with the Chicago Sun-Times. He has won hundreds of awards, and his work has been exhibited and published widely. In 1982 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.

Sunrise on Lake Michigan with Chicago shown in the background. March 1973.
(National Archives and Records Administration)

 

Black sidewalk salesmen arranging their fresh fruits and vegetables on Chicago’s South Side. June 1973

 

Black products was one of the themes at the annual Black Expo held in Chicago. October 1973
Empty housing in the ghetto on Chicago`s South Side. May 1973
Chicago ghetto on the South Side. May 1973

“Chicago ghetto on the South Side. Although the percentage of Chicago blacks making $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58% between 1960 and 1970, a large percentage still remained unemployed. The black unemployment rate is generally assumed to be twice that of the national unemployment rate published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.”

The captions are John White’s own, written some time after he took his photographs. In some cases White used virtually the same caption for several images.
“Black youths play basketball at Stateway Gardens’ high-rise housing project on Chicago’s South Side. The complex has eight buildings with 1,633 two and three bedroom apartments housing 6,825 persons. They were built under the U.S. Housing Acts of 1949 and 1968. They are managed by the Chicago Housing Authority which is responsible for 41,500 public housing dwellings.”

 

“Black youngsters cool off with fire hydrant water on Chicago’s South Side in the Woodlawn community. The kids don’t go to the city beaches and use the fire hydrants to cool off instead. It’s a tradition in the community, comprised of very low income people. The area has high crime and fire records. From 1960 to 1970 the percentage of Chicago blacks with income of $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58%.”
“Young woman soliciting funds for a Chicago organization in a shopping center parking lot. She is one of the nearly 1.2 million black people who make up over a third of the population of Chicago. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. The photos are portraits that reflect pride, love, beauty, hope, struggle, joy, hate, frustration, discontent, worship, and faith. She is a member of her race who is proud of her heritage.”

 

“Minority youngsters who have gathered to have their picture taken on Chicago’s South Side during a talent show. Blacks make up over one third of the 3.6 million population in the city. Chicago census figures for 1970 show a significant gap in economic security between blacks and whites. Only 35% of black families earned $10,000 to $25,000 compared to 60% of white families. Of families earning less than $8,000 a total of 50% were black compared to 21% white.”
“A black man painting a store front on South Wabash Street. One of the nearly 1.2 million people of his race who make up over a third of Chicago’s population. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. In short, they are portraits of human beings who feel they are individuals and are proud of their heritage.” July 1973

 

Religious fervor is mirrored on the face of a Black Muslim woman, one of some 10,000 listening to Elijah Muhammad deliver his annual Savior’s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
`The Fruit of Islam,` a special group of bodyguards for Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad, sits at the bottom of the platform while he delivers his annual Savior`s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
Black bongo player performs at the International Amphitheater in Chicago as part of the annual PUSH [People United to Save Humanity] ‘Black Expo’ in the fall of 1973. October 1973
The Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks on a radio broadcast from the headquarters of Operation PUSH, [People United to Save Humanity] at its annual convention. July 1973
(All photos and text courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)

16 Sexist and Racist Vintage Advertisements That Are Shocking Today

These vintage advertisements are from Beyond Belief, a book by art collector and former advertising executive Charles Saatchi, which brings together the most shocking advertising campaigns of the last century. From racism and sexism to dodgy health claims, nothing was out of bounds for the real-life Mad Men.

“In the middle of the last century, marketing men had few qualms about creating brutally offensive advertisements…It proved a grimly amusing task to find so many examples that I could collect together; they provide a clear insight into the world of the ‘Mad Men’ generation and the consumers they were addressing. Although many of the advertisements selected are alarming they present an important portrait of society in the 1940s and ‘50s.” – Charles Saatchi.

Misogynistic, racist, unscientific, dishonest and just plain bizarre, these ads demonstrate how our attitudes towards women, race, tobacco, personal hygiene and drugs have changed over the years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18 Vintage Photographs Document Runaway Teenagers Living in the Streets of Seattle in the 1980s

Mary Ellen Mark (1941-2015) put her hands on photography in the 1960s, depicting streets scenes in her native Philadelphia as well as anti-Vietnam and women’s rights demonstrations in New York. Quite promptly, when working for Look magazine, the American photographer chose to chronicle the existences of the desperate, the marginals, the homeless, the wounded of life such as Indian street prostitutes, psychiatric patients, juvenile heroine addicts: “I care about people and that’s why I became a photographer.”

In the July 1983 issue of LIFE magazine, writer Cheryl McCall and photographer Mary Ellen Mark published “Streets of the Lost,” an in-depth article and photo essay on Seattle street kids. In the piece, McCall and Mark tell the story of a group of homeless and runaway teens—Tina, a 13-year-old prostitute with dreams of diamonds and furs; Rat and Mike, 16-year-olds who eat from dumpsters; and Dewayne, a 16-year-old boy who hanged himself in a juvenile facility when faced with the prospect of returning to the streets. It’s uneasy subject matter, and a staggering portrait of what life without a stable home can look like.

Despite the darkness of her subjects, Mary Ellen Mark always managed to propose humanistic images, freed from obscenity and disapproval. She also captured the glamour of society as a recognized celebrity portraitist and an on-set photographer for Federico Fellini or Francis Ford Coppola. The photographer succeeded in linking the illustrious with the miserable in the same melancholic yet gentle manner: “I take sad photographs. But look at the tenderness.”

Friends Rat, 16 (far left), and Mike, 17, have this Colt .45 only for defense, they insist, against men who try to pick them up or rob them. "I get hassled a lot" says Rat. "Mike's my protection." They picked Seattle because Mike had once lived there.
Friends Rat, 16 (far left), and Mike, 17, have this Colt .45 only for defense, they insist, against men who try to pick them up or rob them. “I get hassled a lot” says Rat. “Mike’s my protection.” They picked Seattle because Mike had once lived there.
Mike, passing for 18 with a fake I.D., earns $30 a week by selling plasma.
Mike, passing for 18 with a fake I.D., earns $30 a week by selling plasma.
Patti, 16, was arrested minutes after this brawl, cited for simple assault and released. Like many runaways, she learned violence at home and doesn’t hesitate to use it–even though she’s now four months pregnant–to settle all disputes. She is one of nine children, six of whom prefer the terror of the street to life in their Seattle home.
Dark-haired Patti waited until her victim’s pimp was out of sight and then jumped this girl because she never returned a borrowed jacket.
Shaken but unhurt, the girl finds her pimp. He calls the cops.
Shaken but unhurt, the girl finds her pimp. He calls the cops.
Patti’s tender side is reserved for her boyfriend, Munchkin. Patti and her boyfriend, 17, used to share motel rooms with a group of kids. Then Munchkin struck a deal with a motel manager in which Patti exchanges sex with him for a room of their own each night. But they haven’t yet found a solution to the $16 jaywalking and $125 littering tickets they–and all the kids–get almost daily. These are a form of police harassment, and one unpaid littering fine (the only means they have of paying is by prostitution or theft) means five nights in jail.
Erin and her stepfather argue when she’s home. “He doesn’t want me around,” she says. “He wants my mom all to himself.” Erin, 14, has been arrested twice for prostitution. Her probation order states that she must live with her family, not on the streets. Home is a one-room apartment over a tavern in downtown Seattle, and her bed is the couch. Her mother and stepfather, both unemployed, spend most of their time in the bar downstairs. During the year she was on the streets, Erin was raped, was lured into posing for pornographic photographs and supported a pimp by turning tricks.
Laurie, 14, says she was promised $80 by a middle-aged doctor who sexually abused her but reneged on the payment. She recently left Seattle to live with a Christian group in Kent, Wash.
This young dealer is injecting a 14-year-old customer with MDA (methylene dioxy amphetamine) in a crash pad for runaways. At $5 a capsule, MDA is the drug of choice among Seattle street kids–though marijuana is common, and LSD is making a comeback. MDA users need at least five capsules to attain the desired “body rush,” a violent shuddering later followed by sudden vomiting, clenching jaws and twitching eyes. The $1 “rigs” are disposable insulin syringes, but addicts dangerously reuse them as many as 50 times, honing dull needles on matchbook strips and lubricating the plungers with Vaseline.
When a homeless boy collapsed in agonizing spasms, fire department medics speculated his problem was drug related and rushed him to a hospital.
Within an hour of leaving this motel room, the two 14-year-old girls on the right were arrested for prostitution. They call the boy on the bed their “popcorn pimp” because he is only 18.
James, 18, sleeps under a waterfront viaduct.
Rat and Mike call rummaging for food in trash bins behind restaurants dumpster diving.
Rat and Mike call rummaging for food in trash bins behind restaurants dumpster diving.
Rat gives the finger to a man who ignored his begging.
Rat gives the finger to a man who ignored his begging.
This window is the only entry into the hotel.
This window is the only entry into the hotel.

Vintage Photographs of Dublin’s Inner City

David Jazay arrived in Dublin in the early 1980s on a German-Irish school exchange program. The inner city fascinated him right away, and he began photographing its working-class residents and its old Georgian buildings for the next decade.

“It was a rich layer-cake of history, that much was apparent, even if Dubliners tend to remember the late 1980s predominantly as an era of poverty and urban decay. I wanted to go back and explore,” he said via email.

According to a study commissioned by the Dublin Inner City Partnership, the inner city saw its population dwindle to half its size between 1961 and 1991 as unemployment skyrocketed, facilities closed, and buildings were left to decay.

“When I started my project, much of the inner city had all but vanished from public perception.  Brutal, polluting traffic cut the city in two, and the Liffey Quays, once the showpiece of a proud Georgian city, had devolved into a ragged jumble of antique shops, greasy spoons, and car repair places,” he said.

Auction House and Antique Dealers on Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin. 1988.
Patrick Gallagher of Martin+Joyce’s butcher shop, Benburb Street, Dublin, 1992.

While the photos in Jazay’s series, “Dublin Before the Tiger,” document a period of decline, they also celebrate the people and places he came to know as he completed film school and shot his first documentary, Bargaintown, which was recently restored and screened at IFI Docfest. In addition to photos of individual stores and the shopkeepers who minded them, he made panoramas featuring several buildings at once, which he likens to group portraits.

“The biggest one is a continuous, multiple-viewpoint panorama of the Liffey Quays, shot over a length of two miles. Only low speed black and white document film could give me the required resolution. Shot from a distance of 50 meters, one can actually read the lettering on the shopping bags of passers-by,” he said.

 

Left: Ormond Furniture Centre, Dublin, 1985. Right: Ellis Quay Last Post, Dublin, 1988.
TJ Downing’s Grocery, Benburb Street, Dublin,1992.

By 1992, Jazay had photographed Dublin extensively, and, as he prepared to move to London, he felt his project had come to a natural end. In the following years, from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s, Ireland experienced an economic boom—earning the nation’s economy the name of “Celtic Tiger”—and Dublin’s neighborhoods rapidly transformed. By the time Jazay started returning to the city in 2013 to revisit the project, almost none of the buildings he’d photographed were still standing. But some of the people remained, and as he now photographs the new and old residents of contemporary Dublin, he says he is glad to have a visual record that links the two.

“To have shared a moment in time and to have made a contribution to the audiovisual heritage of a place—that’s what drives me.”

Ellis Quay, Bargaintown, Dublin, 1988,

(Via Slate)

Checkout these 10 Fascinating photos of Chinatown, New York in the 1900s.

Never Before Seen Photos of Vivian Maier

Since Vivian Maier’s photographs were unearthed at an auction several years back, her work and her story have captivated people across the world. The idea that a lifelong nanny was secretly an astoundingly good street photographer—that the greatest collection of photos of Chicago from the 1950s through the 1970s had been sitting undiscovered in storage unit on the South Side—prompted blog post after blog post, story after story, exhibit after exhibit. Most of these offered very little in terms of biographical information about the highly private Maier, who didn’t seem to have any family or close friends.

But surely there had been someone. A secret lover? A neighbor turned confidant, who would turn up and explain what drove Maier to carry a camera around her neck every day of her life, to capture beautiful, moving, and humorous portraits and scenes and share them with no one? Co-authors Richard Cahan and Michael Williams spent the last year attempting to fill the gaps in the story of Vivian Maier. They contacted just about every home she’d worked in, interviewed the children she cared for, the neighbors who watched her with skepticism as she pointed her camera into garbage cans. They found the people who repaired her cameras and those who sold her film. And the answer, sadly, for those of us hoping to get even further into Vivian Maier’s brain, is no. There was no one. Maier’s only partner in life, her only confidant, was her camera.

The images below, along with the majority of the other images in Cahan and Williams’ book Vivian Maier: Out of the Shadows have never before been seen. She kept them locked away from the families she worked for, never sharing them with anyone—even herself. The images come from 20,000 scanned negatives that don’t appear ever to have been printed during her lifetime.

Coney Island, New York, 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press.)
Coney Island, New York, 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press.)
Wilmette Beach, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Wilmette Beach, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Wilmette Beach, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Wilmette Beach, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
New York City 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
New York City 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
New York City 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
New York City 1950s. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Wilmette, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Wilmette, 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
The chicken man, 1967, Maxwell Street Market and skid row on west Madison Street in Chicago. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
The chicken man, 1967, Maxwell Street Market and skid row on west Madison Street in Chicago. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Maxwell Street Market and skid row on West Madison Street in Chicago, 1967. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Maxwell Street Market and skid row on West Madison Street in Chicago, 1967. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)

 

Woman taunts a police officer before the start of the Democratic Conventionat the International ampitheater Chicago in 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)
Woman taunts a police officer before the start of the Democratic Conventionat the International ampitheater Chicago in 1968. (Photograph by Vivian Maier/Courtesy Cityfiles Press)

(via Slate)

Checkout the street photos of Fred Herzog of Vancouver.