18 Hilariously Awkward Haircuts of Vintage Christian Album Covers

The digital music revolution has, for the most part, been great for music fans. But even though listening to music online costs less and gives you access to millions and millions of songs you might not otherwise hear, one thing has sadly been lost in the streaming era: Appreciation for incredible album art.

Sure, we still see tiny thumbnail images of singles and LP album covers displayed next to the song streaming on our iPhones, but it’s just not the same as regularly examining album covers in all of their visual glory. In the world of Christian music, where many artists used the cover to blend spiritual metaphors with airbrushed supernatural entities, inspired outfits and creative font selections, there is truly something that modern music fans are missing.

Here, below is a collection of 18 vintage Vintage album covers that feature artists with the craziest hairdos. Most of them look like they’re from the 1960s but there’s at least one from an ’80s Christian hair band. Hopefully we don’t see a resurgence of these hairstyles, but who knows… your move hipsters!













Stunning Photos of Natalie Wood by Angelo Frontoni in 1965

Natalie Wood was one of Hollywood’s most glamours movie stars until she mysteriously died in a drowning accident in the early 1980’s. The following are rare, never seen before photos of the actress.

Natalie Wood in evening gown by Mainbocher in bedroom of her home in Beverly Hills, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood in evening gown by Mainbocher in bedroom of her home in Beverly Hills, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood poses in an evening gown with David Niven Jr. looking on, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood poses in an evening gown with David Niven Jr. looking on, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood at home in Beverly Hills, Ca., photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood at home in Beverly Hills, Ca., photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood with Italian fashion designer Patrick de Barentzen at a private showing of his collection, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood with Italian fashion designer Patrick de Barentzen at a private showing of his collection, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood on the set of the movie"The Great Race", directed by Blake Edwards, photo by Angelo Frontoni on the Universal Studios backlot, 1965.
Natalie Wood on the set of the movie”The Great Race”, directed by Blake Edwards, photo by Angelo Frontoni on the Universal Studios backlot, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, Ca., 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, Ca., 1965.
Natalie Wood in the back yard of her Beverly Hills home, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood in the back yard of her Beverly Hills home, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.

You might also like these 23 must see photos of Natalie Wood!

26 Wild Photos of New Yorks Notorious Studio 54 Disco Club

Studio 54 is a former nightclub and currently a Broadway theatre, located at 254 West 54th Street, between Eighth Avenue and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, originally built as the Gallo Opera House, opened in 1927, after which it changed names several times, eventually becoming CBS radio and television Studio 52.

In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.The nightclub founders spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on professional lighting design and kept many of the former TV and theatrical sets, in the process creating a unique dance club that became famous for its celebrity guest lists, restrictive (and subjective) entry policies (based on one’s appearance and style), and open club drug use. Founded and created by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager in 1977, it was sold in 1980 to Mark Fleischman,[7][8][9] who reopened the club after it had been shut down following the conviction of Rubell and Schrager on charges of tax evasion. In 1984, Fleischman sold the club, which continued to operate until 1986.

Since November 1998, it has served as a venue for productions of the Roundabout Theatre Company and retains the name Studio 54. A separate restaurant and nightclub, Feinstein’s/54 Below, operates in the basement of the building.


















Rare Vintage Photos of Fashion Designer Kate Spade





With her irreverent style and bookish glasses, Spade was unmistakable, pedaling on a three-speed Schwinn bicycle — wicker basket intact and leopard coat afloat — along the Manhattan streets. The designer was big on biking for transportation long before Citibike, or designated bike lanes, appeared in the city. Occasionally dressed like she may have stepped out of “The Official Preppy Handbook,” Spade was always unabashed about embracing color. She and Andy were also highly stylized in their marketing and in-store displays, taking an arty approach to curated retail well before others jumped into the fold.Before they were Kate Spade the brand, the Spades were college sweethearts from the Midwest, she from Kansas City and he from Arizona. After graduation, they were New York-bound with her working as an accessories editor at Mademoiselle and him delving into advertising at TBWA/Chiat/Day. In a 2013 interview with WWD, the couple recalled how they sort of fell into fashion. Musing about starting a company one night over dinner at an Upper West Side Mexican restaurant, he suggested Spade start her own handbag company since she was an accessories aficionado. When she suggested, “It’s not like you can just start a handbag company.” He told her, “Well, why not?”
The then yet-to-be-wed pair decided Kate Spade had a better ring to it. Knowing she wanted simple, straightforward totes, Spade also recognized the market consisted of Coach, European brands and a slew of hardware going on. Her first samples were made of linen and burlap — the only choice — for a no-name designer with no track record and no minimums. Eventually, they morphed into durable nylon bags — 10 in navy and 10 in black — for their first trade show at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. But that was just enough for Barneys New York’s Judy Collinson and Vogue’s Candy Pratts Price, who liked what they saw and supported the brand accordingly.
“I believe Kate first started with the straw bags that were very Fifties,” said Pratts Price, Vogue’s former accessories director. “She always had that sensibility of cheerful, lollipop colors; it was a very Kate Spade look. This was pre-us even knowing Magnolia Bakery or macaroon colors. Kate was not giving you goth, and she was not giving you a period of cinema noir or anything. There was nothing hard about this. This was all very cheerful, very colorful. And she was. That’s what I remember. I’m sure I covered her bags in my pages The Last Look, because they were always wonderful, structured shapes. And there were the cute nylon bags — before we all got into big-time nylon. You could call on her and say, ‘We’re doing the beach and we need straw bags’ and she would do it. She was such a good player. There was never any darkness. She was very happy with what she sewed. It wasn’t like, ‘I’m just doing this.’ She was doing it with great love.”

Handbag designer Kate Spade
Handbag designer Kate Spade
Kate Spade at an event with handbags of her own design on October 9, 1998 in New York
Kate Spade at an event with handbags of her own design on October 9, 1998 in New York
Kate Spade in her showroom in New York in 2001
Kate Spade in her showroom in New York in 2001
Kate Spade attends Steven Sebring’s “Bygone Days” book signing at Ralph Lauren SoHo.
Kate Spade attends Steven Sebring’s “Bygone Days” book signing at Ralph Lauren SoHo.
Designer Kate Spade with Steve Ruzow, Kate Spade CEO on March 13, 1998 in New York
Designer Kate Spade with Steve Ruzow, Kate Spade CEO on March 13, 1998 in New York
Thom Browne and Kate Spade in 2010.
Thom Browne and Kate Spade in 2010. STEVE EICHNER
Kate Spade and Michael Kors attend the CFDA preview of ‘Fashioning Fiction,’ at MOMA PS1 in 2004.
Kate Spade and Michael Kors attend the CFDA preview of ‘Fashioning Fiction,’ at MOMA PS1 in 2004. JOHN CALABRESE
Kate Spade handbags in her store store in 2000
Kate Spade handbags in her store store in 2000
Slippers in a Kate Spade store in 2000
Slippers in a Kate Spade store in 2000
Models in looks from Kate Spade on September 16, 2003 in New York.
Models in looks from Kate Spade on September 16, 2003 in New York.

(Via WWD)

30 Wild Photos That Capture the Disco Scene of the 1970s

The heyday of the 1970s disco scene fashion blossomed from the music played at gay underground New York clubs such as the Loft, Tenth Floor, and 12 West in the early 1970s. Other clubs such as Infinity, Flamingo, the Paradise Garage, Le Jardin, and the Saint launched a disco culture that brought with it an anything-goes attitude and all-night dancing.

Studio 54 became the place to be seen in disco clothing such as boob-tubes, platform shoes, flared trousers and body-conscious shapes dressed in lurex, glitter and crazy patterns or colours. Studio 54 played an essential role creating the nightclub scene that is still with us today – a place where people dress to be noticed and in the latest fashion.

The successful movie Saturday Night Fever (1977) ensured that disco hung around for a few years before becoming very unfashionable when Punk Rock and New Wave became the new anti-fashion fashion. Below are 30 vintage photographs that show just how crazy 1970s disco really was…

A group of people get down on a mirrored dance floor, circa 1978. (David Redfern / Redferns)
A group of people get down on a mirrored dance floor, circa 1978. (David Redfern / Redferns)
1970s disco scene. The Village People perform live as the audience dance the “YMCA” at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California, circa 1970. (Amanda Edwards / Redferns / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene
A couple bring their dancing to the floor of the disco club Fun House in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Divine, Grace Jones, and friends celebrate Jones’ birthday at Xenon, 1978. (Ron Galella / WireImage / Getty Images)
A man blowing a whistle in a sparkling purple outfit dances at Studio 54, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman dances amid other partygoers at Studio 54, 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A man performs with fire at the disco club Infinity in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Bianca Jagger rides into Studio 54 on a white horse during her birthday celebrations in 1977. (Rose Hartman / Getty Images)
A woman dances in ecstasy at a disco in New York City, 1976. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
The Jacksons perform during a concert, circa 1975. (Gary Merrin / Getty Images)
A couple dance at Studio 54 in 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
People dances on couches at Xenon, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. A group of DJs spin records at a disco club in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A group of partygoers join in a synchronized dance number in an unidentified club, circa 1977. (David Redfern / Redferns / Getty Images)
A woman dances between two men at Studio 54, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A dance club blends into a kaleidoscopic haze at a disco club in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Grace Jones at the disco club Studio 54 in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Grace Jones at the disco club Studio 54 in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Metallic-painted dancers at a disco club perform on stage in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman known as “Disco Granny” dances with a young man at Studio 54, circa 1978. (Images Press / Getty Images)
A crowd of dancers at the disco club in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A disco DJ smokes a cigarette while spinning a record at a club in New York City, 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman enters the dance floor at Studio 54, 1977. 1970s disco scene.
A couple wearing matching high socks dance at the disco club Xenon in New York City, 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A woman wipes the sweat from her face at Studio 54, 1977. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
A group of older men and women relax on the sidelines of a disco club in New York City in 1978. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
Actor and singer Grace Jones gives a big smile to the camera while partying at Studio 54 in New York City, 1978. (Rose Hartman / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. A man and woman take center stage on the dance floor at the disco club 2001 Odyssey in Brooklyn, New York, in 1979. (Waring Abbott / Getty Images)
The Queen of Disco Donna Summer performs onstage in a feather costume, circa 1976. (Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images)
1970s disco scene. David Bowie and Dutch actor and singer Romy Haag have a smoke at the Alcazar nightclub in Paris during 1976. (Rda / Getty Images)

40 Fun Street Style Shots From the 1970s

Fashion in the 1970s began with a continuation of the mini skirts, bell-bottoms, and the androgynous hippie look from the late 1960s and eventually became an iconic decade for fashion.

Generally the most famous silhouette of the mid and late 1970s for both genders was that of tight on top and loose on bottom.

The 1970s also saw the birth of the indifferent, anti-conformist casual chic approach to fashion, which consisted of sweaters, T-shirts, jeans and sneakers.

Here are 40 vintage photographs that capture street styles from the 1970s.







































Check out these 14 funny photos of 1980s fashion for guys.

Old Color Photos of Native Americans

As a filmmaker, Paul Ratner is drawn to old color photos of Native Americans. His first love of film came from old black and white movies by world cinema auteurs like the jarring works of Bergman, Eisenstein, Bunuel, Lang, Dreyer, Ozu and other great masters. For a while in college, he felt it was almost like cheating to watch a film made in color. As Ratner grew older, heaccepted color and now finds it hard to stick to a monochrome diet. Life seems too resplendent for just one tone, he notes.

While making Moses on the Mesa, a film about a German-Jewish immigrant who fell in love with a Native-American woman and became governor of her tribe of Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico in the late 1800s, Ratner developed a passion for researching old photographs of indigenous people. They were black and white photos of a beautiful mystical people, and it felt inconceivable that anyone would want to exterminate them from this continent as a conscious policy stretching over hundreds of years. It just seemed so barbaric and inhumane. Delving deeper into the research, he started coming across colorized photos of these first Americans. In them the people started to come to life even more. Looking at them he sees regular people but also royalty. They are in a way no different than historical portraits of European kings, queens and nobility. Except that not only do they show majestic regalia, but also strong, natural faces rather than the weak, powdered gazes of the often-interbred rulers from across the ocean that brought their demise.

Many of the photographs Ratner found were colored by hand, as color film was only the domain of experimentalists until 1930s (thanks, Kodachrome!) Painting on black and white prints was an art in and of itself, and many of the colorized photos exhibit true talent which preserved for us the truer likeness of the people many a hundred years ago thought were vanishing. Of course, Native Americans have not vanished despite the harrowing efforts of so many. They are growing stronger as a people, but a way of life they left behind is often only found in these photos.

Handpainted print of a young woman by the river. Early 1900s. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
“In Summer”. Kiowa. 1898. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Source – Boston Public Library
Geronimo (Goyaałé). Apache. 1898. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Omaha, Nebraska. Source – Boston Public Library.
Blackfeet tribal camp with grazing horses. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
Bone Necklace. Oglala Lakota Chief. 1899. Photo by Heyn Photo. Source – Library of Congress.
Charles American Horse (the son of Chief American Horse). Oglala Lakota. 1901. Photo by William Herman Rau. Source – Princeton Digital Library.
Cheyenne Chief Wolf Robe. Color halftone reproduction of a painting from a F. A. Rinehart photograph. 1898. Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
A Crow dancer. Early 1900s. Photo by Richard Throssel. Source – University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center.
Amos Two Bulls. Lakota. Photo by Gertrude Käsebier. 1900. Source – Library of Congress.
A medicine man with patient. Taos Pueblo, New Mexico. 1905. Photo by Carl Moon. Source – Huntington Digital Library.
Chief Little Wound and family. Oglala Lakota. 1899. Photo by Heyn Photo. Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
Eagle Arrow. A Siksika man. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
Handpainted print depicting five riders going downhill in Montana. Early 1900s. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science .
Strong Left Hand and family. Northern Cheyenne Reservation. 1906. Photo by Julia Tuell. Source – Buzz Tuell, Tuell Pioneer Photography.
Piegan men giving prayer to the Thunderbird near a river in Montana. 1912. Photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
Old Coyote (aka Yellow Dog). Crow. Original photo circa 1879 (color tinted circa 1910). Source – Denver Public Library Digital Collections.
Thunder Tipi of Brings-Down-The-Sun. Blackfoot camp. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source -Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

These old color photos of Native Americans bring to life the rich detail of their clothing and jewelry.

Arrowmaker, an Ojibwe man. 1903. Photochrom print by the Detroit Photographic Co. Source – Library of Congress.
Acoma pueblo. New Mexico. Early 1900s. Photo by Chicago Transparency Company. Source – Palace of the Governors Archives. New Mexico History Museum.

These old color photos of Native Americans were originally printed in black and white.

“Songlike”, a Pueblo man, 1899. Photo by F.A. Rinehart. Source – Boston Public Library.
Northern Plains man on an overlook. Montana. Early 1900s. Hand-colored photo by Roland W. Reed. Source – Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

Old color photos of Native Americans

(Via Huffington Post)

Slim Aarons: fashion and celebrities of the ’50s and’ 60s

The lifestyle of the ’50s and’ 60s is seen with a certain nostalgia especially in these times of crisis and difficulty, and is remembered for the celebrities and fashion fashion that characterized it. While in Italy there was the Dolce Vita Romana, in New York Slim Aarons photographed the celebrities and the most famous jet set in the world. Already at the age of 18 he began taking photographs while he was still serving in the United States Army. After World War II, Aaron moved to Cali and began photographing Celebrities (the collection below, including Marilyn Monroe, JFK, Clark Gable and Humphrey Bogart).

He began working for the magazine, the “Town & Country” and various magazines of free time. Aarons was known for not using under any circumstances make-up artists, stylists or other accessories that had distorted the chronological character of photography. To find out what made him choose the profession of photographer, he said: “Taking pictures of attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places”. He had excellent contacts in the celebrity environment, and more than a photographer or paparazzo he was considered a friend in Hollywood. Slim Aarons died in 2006, at age 90, due to complications of a stroke.

Slim Aarons photos

Slim Aarons photos

Slim Aarons photos Slim Aarons photos Slim Aarons photos

14 Funny photos of 1980s fashion

The Bullet Bra: indispensable lingerie for the 40s and 50s women!

The bullet bra certainly made a statement! Given this was the 1940’s and 1950’s it must of caused quite a stir! The projectile bra was an intimate item of clothing that became famous in the post-war period, in the late 1950s, and remained in use until the 1960s. The characteristic of the bra was obviously to be “pointy”, extending the breast line far beyond the normal physiognomy of the female body.

Known as the  “Bullet Bra”, it was made famous by actresses like Marilyn Monroe and Lana Turner, but also by the pinup Betty Paige. Made of rayon or nylon, they were built from several connected cones, able to support the breasts before the invention of the underwire.

During the 60s, the “Twiggy” style became famous, the famous thread-like model that made the “curved” bra superfluous. The “bullets” then became both little used because of the new bras, more comfortable and comfortable, both because of the tendency to mask their typical shapes of the ’60s and’ 70s. In the ’80s we witnessed a nostalgic revival by Madonna, and even today passionate about vintage sport the pointed bras in dedicated parties.

bullet bra

bullet bra

bullet bra

bullet bra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bullet bra is almost as funny as  one of these  bouffant big hair styles!

14 Funny Photos of 1980s Fashion For Guys

1980s fashion for guys
Beachware

Unlike women, 1980s fashion for guys seems to change little from decade to decade.  Ralph Loren Polo dress shirts were a hot item with their tiny embroidered polo player.   And so were  tacky winter sweaters that are sold on the Internet today as joke items.  Boat shoes, Docker dress pants and pastel colors were also all the rage. 1980s fashion for guys usually favoured the “clean-cut” look as to today’s “bush” guy look. (Facial hair is everywhere!) 1980s fashion for guys 1980s fashion for guys

Photos courtesy of Alan Light.