20 Vintage Photos of Young Jackie Chan in His Early Kung Ku Movies

Jackie Chan played a fair few small roles and did a lot of stunts in movies before taking the lead in some of the films listed further down. He had a minuscule part in Come Drink with Me at the age of 16 and even the highly regarded A Touch of Zen (among other films), before doing stunts in Bruce Lee’s films Fist of Furyand Enter the Dragon. Jackie is a big Bruce Lee fan and did a lot of uncredited work in films during those years of his fame – in movies like Hapkido.

But it was after the death of Bruce Lee that Jackie was being given the opportunity to take on bigger roles. Although it was mainly because the big wigs wanted him to become the next Bruce Lee, they put him in films like The New Fist of Fury, a sequel to the original Bruce Lee’s film.

Of course he eventually broke through into the Kung Fu comedy scene with Snake in the Eagles Shadow and Drunken Master and became the legendary actor everyone knows today.




















Stunning Photos of Natalie Wood by Angelo Frontoni in 1965

Natalie Wood was one of Hollywood’s most glamours movie stars until she mysteriously died in a drowning accident in the early 1980’s. The following are rare, never seen before photos of the actress.

Natalie Wood in evening gown by Mainbocher in bedroom of her home in Beverly Hills, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood in evening gown by Mainbocher in bedroom of her home in Beverly Hills, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood poses in an evening gown with David Niven Jr. looking on, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood poses in an evening gown with David Niven Jr. looking on, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood at home in Beverly Hills, Ca., photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood at home in Beverly Hills, Ca., photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, 1965.
Natalie Wood with Italian fashion designer Patrick de Barentzen at a private showing of his collection, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood with Italian fashion designer Patrick de Barentzen at a private showing of his collection, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood on the set of the movie"The Great Race", directed by Blake Edwards, photo by Angelo Frontoni on the Universal Studios backlot, 1965.
Natalie Wood on the set of the movie”The Great Race”, directed by Blake Edwards, photo by Angelo Frontoni on the Universal Studios backlot, 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, Ca., 1965.
Natalie Wood, photo by Angelo Frontoni, Beverly Hills, Ca., 1965.
Natalie Wood in the back yard of her Beverly Hills home, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.
Natalie Wood in the back yard of her Beverly Hills home, photo by Angelo Frontoni, 1965.

You might also like these 23 must see photos of Natalie Wood!

26 Wild Photos of New Yorks Notorious Studio 54 Disco Club

Studio 54 is a former nightclub and currently a Broadway theatre, located at 254 West 54th Street, between Eighth Avenue and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, originally built as the Gallo Opera House, opened in 1927, after which it changed names several times, eventually becoming CBS radio and television Studio 52.

In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.The nightclub founders spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on professional lighting design and kept many of the former TV and theatrical sets, in the process creating a unique dance club that became famous for its celebrity guest lists, restrictive (and subjective) entry policies (based on one’s appearance and style), and open club drug use. Founded and created by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager in 1977, it was sold in 1980 to Mark Fleischman,[7][8][9] who reopened the club after it had been shut down following the conviction of Rubell and Schrager on charges of tax evasion. In 1984, Fleischman sold the club, which continued to operate until 1986.

Since November 1998, it has served as a venue for productions of the Roundabout Theatre Company and retains the name Studio 54. A separate restaurant and nightclub, Feinstein’s/54 Below, operates in the basement of the building.


















Rare 1980s Photos Michael Jackson Shooting Music Video Bad

Michael Jackson’s hit song BAD was shot at the Brooklyn Hoyt-Schermerhorn station.  The music video shot by master Martin Scorses was released in November 1986 with an 19 minute short film.

Bad is MIchael Jackson’s seventh record  released on August 31, 1987 in the US by Epic Records and internationally by CBS Records. It was released nearly five years after Jackson’s previous album, Thriller (1982). Bad was recorded during the first half of 1987. The lyrical themes include media bias, paranoia, racial profiling, romance, self-improvement and world peace. The album cemented Jackson’s status as one of the most successful artists of the 1980s.

Bad saw Michael Jackson exercise even more artistic freedom than he did with his two previous Epic releases (Off the Wall and Thriller); Jackson composed nine of the album’s eleven tracks, and received co-producer credit for the entire album. Nine of the eleven songs on Bad were released as singles; one was a promotional single, and another was released outside of the US and Canada. Five of the singles hit No. 1 in the US, while a sixth charted within the top ten, and a seventh charted within the top twenty on the Hot 100. Bad peaked at No. 1 in thirteen countries and charted within the top twenty in other territories. The only songs on the album which were not released as commercial singles were “Speed Demon” and “Just Good Friends”.

This continued Jackson’s commercial success in the late 1980s, and garnered six Grammy Award nominations, winning two. Apart from commercial success, it was well received by contemporary critics. The record produced a record five Billboard Hot 100 number one singles. Bad was ranked No. 43 in the 100 Greatest Albums of All Time of the MTV Generation in 2009 by VH1 and number 202 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Bad has sold an estimated 35 million copies worldwide and has been cited as one of the best-selling albums of all time. In 2017, the album was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America, denoting sales of over ten million copies in the United States.

Rare Vintage Photos of Fashion Designer Kate Spade





With her irreverent style and bookish glasses, Spade was unmistakable, pedaling on a three-speed Schwinn bicycle — wicker basket intact and leopard coat afloat — along the Manhattan streets. The designer was big on biking for transportation long before Citibike, or designated bike lanes, appeared in the city. Occasionally dressed like she may have stepped out of “The Official Preppy Handbook,” Spade was always unabashed about embracing color. She and Andy were also highly stylized in their marketing and in-store displays, taking an arty approach to curated retail well before others jumped into the fold.Before they were Kate Spade the brand, the Spades were college sweethearts from the Midwest, she from Kansas City and he from Arizona. After graduation, they were New York-bound with her working as an accessories editor at Mademoiselle and him delving into advertising at TBWA/Chiat/Day. In a 2013 interview with WWD, the couple recalled how they sort of fell into fashion. Musing about starting a company one night over dinner at an Upper West Side Mexican restaurant, he suggested Spade start her own handbag company since she was an accessories aficionado. When she suggested, “It’s not like you can just start a handbag company.” He told her, “Well, why not?”
The then yet-to-be-wed pair decided Kate Spade had a better ring to it. Knowing she wanted simple, straightforward totes, Spade also recognized the market consisted of Coach, European brands and a slew of hardware going on. Her first samples were made of linen and burlap — the only choice — for a no-name designer with no track record and no minimums. Eventually, they morphed into durable nylon bags — 10 in navy and 10 in black — for their first trade show at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. But that was just enough for Barneys New York’s Judy Collinson and Vogue’s Candy Pratts Price, who liked what they saw and supported the brand accordingly.
“I believe Kate first started with the straw bags that were very Fifties,” said Pratts Price, Vogue’s former accessories director. “She always had that sensibility of cheerful, lollipop colors; it was a very Kate Spade look. This was pre-us even knowing Magnolia Bakery or macaroon colors. Kate was not giving you goth, and she was not giving you a period of cinema noir or anything. There was nothing hard about this. This was all very cheerful, very colorful. And she was. That’s what I remember. I’m sure I covered her bags in my pages The Last Look, because they were always wonderful, structured shapes. And there were the cute nylon bags — before we all got into big-time nylon. You could call on her and say, ‘We’re doing the beach and we need straw bags’ and she would do it. She was such a good player. There was never any darkness. She was very happy with what she sewed. It wasn’t like, ‘I’m just doing this.’ She was doing it with great love.”

Handbag designer Kate Spade
Handbag designer Kate Spade
Kate Spade at an event with handbags of her own design on October 9, 1998 in New York
Kate Spade at an event with handbags of her own design on October 9, 1998 in New York
Kate Spade in her showroom in New York in 2001
Kate Spade in her showroom in New York in 2001
Kate Spade attends Steven Sebring’s “Bygone Days” book signing at Ralph Lauren SoHo.
Kate Spade attends Steven Sebring’s “Bygone Days” book signing at Ralph Lauren SoHo.
Designer Kate Spade with Steve Ruzow, Kate Spade CEO on March 13, 1998 in New York
Designer Kate Spade with Steve Ruzow, Kate Spade CEO on March 13, 1998 in New York
Thom Browne and Kate Spade in 2010.
Thom Browne and Kate Spade in 2010. STEVE EICHNER
Kate Spade and Michael Kors attend the CFDA preview of ‘Fashioning Fiction,’ at MOMA PS1 in 2004.
Kate Spade and Michael Kors attend the CFDA preview of ‘Fashioning Fiction,’ at MOMA PS1 in 2004. JOHN CALABRESE
Kate Spade handbags in her store store in 2000
Kate Spade handbags in her store store in 2000
Slippers in a Kate Spade store in 2000
Slippers in a Kate Spade store in 2000
Models in looks from Kate Spade on September 16, 2003 in New York.
Models in looks from Kate Spade on September 16, 2003 in New York.

(Via WWD)

Candid Anthony Bourdain’s Childhood Photos Before He Became the Most Influential Chef in the World




“I have the best job in the world. If I’m unhappy, it’s a failure of imagination.”

Born on June 25, 1956, in New York City and raised in New Jersey, Anthony Bourdain knew he’d be a chef while vacationing on the coast on France with his parents as a boy. A local fisherman offered him an oyster fresh from the sea; he ate it, and “That was it, man,” Bourdain said in an interview. “That was it.”
In 2012, Bourdain wrote an essay about his father for Bon Appétit and shared a collection of his childhood photographs. “My father was, as he liked to say, ‘a man of simple needs.’ He grew up with a French mother, a French name, speaking French, and spent many summers in France. But this history wasn’t really a factor in my childhood. It always came as a shock to me when he’d break into French with a Haitian cabdriver as there was, seemingly, nothing ‘French’ about him, or us, or how we lived.
He taught me early that the value of a dish is the pleasure it brings you; where you are sitting when you eat it—and who you are eating it with—are what really matter. Perhaps the most important life lesson he passed on was: Don’t be a snob. It’s something I will always at least aspire to—something that has allowed me to travel this world and eat all it has to offer without fear or prejudice. To experience joy, my father taught me, one has to leave oneself open to it.”
Bourdain was found dead of an apparent suicide by his friend Éric Ripert on June 8, 2018, in his hotel room in Kaysersberg-Vignoble, France. He was working on an episode of Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown in Strasbourg, France.
CNN confirmed the death of their colleague, while adding, “His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller. His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much.”















(Via vintagees)

10 Classic Hollywood Stars Who Had Plastic Surgery

When you look at the famous stars of the classic Hollywood era, do you think they’ve always looked like that? Do you think their beauty is always natural? We often assume that old Hollywood stars are just naturally beautiful, and never had anything done, just because it was a long time ago, and because they look different to what modern celebrities look like now.

Plastic surgery has actually been a staple for Hollywood stars since 1920s. A lot of the stars we consider to be the beauty icons of classic Hollywood have actually had plastic surgery and today we’re going to take a look at some of them and what they’ve had done.

1. Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr was the first actress who admitted to having plastic surgery. It was reported that the actress got her first plastic surgery in 1960s. Some of plastic surgery procedures she had were facelift, nose job, lip enhancement and Botox injection.

2. Joan Crawford

After undergoing cosmetic surgery in 1953, the year of her MGM comeback, Crawford was quoted as saying, “The face and boobs are new, only the ass is the same.”After undergoing cosmetic surgery in 1953, the year of her MGM comeback, Crawford was quoted as saying, “The face and boobs are new, only the ass is the same.”

3. Lana Turner

In her early 60s, Turner reportedly took a photo of herself at 27 to a plastic surgeon, Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, and said, “This is what I want to look like.”

 

4. Marilyn Monroe

There’s been a lot of discussion regarding Marilyn’s beauty over the years, and how much of it was natural and whether or not she’s had plastic surgery. She never mentioned it, which was probably the smart thing to do at the time. However around 50 years after her death it was revealed to the public that she had, in fact, had plastic surgery done. She has undergone a rhinoplasty, which was very dangerous at the time, and the shape of her chin was changed too. While Marilyn was already gorgeous to begin with, she did have a little help from a plastic surgeon.

5. Marlene Dietrich

People say you could cut yourself on Marlene Dietrich’s cheekbones, but were those sharp features god given to her? Well, it’s hard to tell, we know for sure that lighting and makeup had something to do with that. But what’s more horrifying is that apparently Dietrich has had several molars surgically removed in order to achieve those sharp cheeks. How does that even work? Don’t ask us, that was a weird time for Hollywood.

 

6. Dean Martin

As it turns out, the King of Cool apparently wasn’t that cool with some of his features. In fact, Dean Martin, the famous actor, singer, comedian went under the knife when his career started taking off. He got rhinoplasty in order to make his nose look narrower. As you can see the plastic surgery was a great success. The shape of his nose stayed pretty much the same, but it wasn’t as wide anymore.

7. RIta Hayworth

Rita Hayworth was known as the sex symbol of Hollywood in 1940s, but do you know how much she had to go through for that title? Rita didn’t always look like the redheaded icon we remember. Her hair used to be dark, her forehead – narrow and her skin – a bit darker, after all, Rita was of Spanish descent. In order to look like the Hollywood stars of that time she’s had to undergo electrolysis hair removal to push her hairline back and therefore make her forehead bigger. She then colored her hair red and even whitened her skin. That’s the price you had to pay back in the day to get into Hollywood.

8. Carmen Miranda

Unlike a lot of classic Hollywood stars, who had their plastic surgeries in order to succeed in Hollywood, and way before they were famous, Carmen had hers after she was already quite famous. She never liked how wide her nose was, so she got surgery to make it look thinner. It would’ve been fine if she stopped there, but she also decided to have a facelift, which basically left her looking surprised for the rest of her life.

9. Mary Pickford

This is probably the most tragic case of plastic surgery in old Hollywood. Mary was a star of silent movies in the 1920s, and everything was going well for her. However she was worried about getting older and getting wrinkles, so she opted for a facelift way too early. After the procedure she didn’t have any wrinkles, but she also wasn’t able to smile or portray most of human emotions. Her face just wasn’t as flexible anymore, which ultimately brought the end to her career as a movie star.

10. Rudolph Valentino

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It’s just women who went under the knife in order to succeed in Hollywood. Rudolph Valentino, the star of silent movies, also has had to undergo plastic surgery and his was pretty bizarre. He went under the knife to change the shape of his ears, of all things. Apparently he couldn’t get any good parts because he was always told his ears stick out weird. So he corrected that tiny, seemingly insignificant detail, and suddenly he started getting multiple parts offered to him. Who knew the shape of your ears mattered when it came to acting, right?

(via Her Beauty)

20 Vintage Red Man Chewing Tobacco Ads

The Red Man brand of chewing tobacco was first introduced to the US in 1904. Promotional activities tied-in with rural and outdoor sporting events was a main stay of Red Man s marketing strategy. From 1952 to 1955, Red Man produced a series of baseball cards, the only tobacco company to do so after 1920. The sets are valuable due to the appearance of top players including Stan Musial, Yogi Berra and Willie Mays.1 Red Man also sponsored other sporting events such as Red Man All-American Pulling Series, a tractor pulling competition and the “Red Man All-American Bass Championship”, a fishing competition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National League Player #25. Willie Mays, Outfield, New York Giants. The return of Willie from his hitch in the Army bodes good things for the 1954 Giants. When Willie joined the team in 1951, after hitting.477 for 35 games in Minneapolis – the Giants weren’t doing so well. however, as all fans know, they wound up the year with a pennant. Willie loves to play ball, and his fielding is wonderful . He once caught a ball on the run in deep center at the Polo Grounds, whirled and threw a perfect strike to the plate to catch a man trying to score from third after the catch. This was in a vital game with Brooklyn in 1951.

American League Player #17. Joe Coleman, Pitcher, Baltimore Orioles. Joe made a fine comeback in 1954, overcoming a sore arm that had threatened to finish his career. He appeared in 33 games for the Orioles, a weak hitting team, and won 13, losing 17. He gave up 184 hits in 221 innings pitched, and struckout 103. The preceding season with the Philadelphia Athletics Joe appeared in 24 games, winning 3 and losing 4.

(Courtesy of Stanford Research)

You might like these old Camel Cigarette ads that show doctors smoking cigarettes!

ABBA’a Pretty Blonde: 22 Georgeous Photos of Agnetha Faltskog in the 1970s and1980s

ABBA was a very popular Swedish performing group during the 1970s and the early 1980s. The group was comprised of two females, Agnetha Faltskog and Anni-Frid “Frida” Lyngstad, and two males, Bjorn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson. Agnetha and Bjorn were married from 1971-1980 and Anni-Frid and Benny were married from 1978-1982.

It was really due to the charm of Agnetha and Frida that ABBA became so popular.

“Bjorn and I may compose the songs, but the girls are the ones who bring in the sound,” Benny said when the group was still together. “If you leave their voices out, it’s not ABBA anymore.”

Agnetha, also known as Anna, was born on April 5, 1950 at Jonkoping, Sweden. She was the blonde woman in ABBA. For men fond of Swedish blondes, Agnetha was a real heart-throb. She was once known in the press as “the woman with the most sexiest bottom of Europe.”

 

 

 

 

(Via VE)

Shirtless Authors From Mark Twain to Hemingway!

A shirtless photo of Mark Twain has taken the Web by storm. From Faulkner to Hemingway, here are other writers who’ve gone topless

Mark Twain, possibly apocryphally, once said: “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” America’s favorite writer is of course much better known for dressing up in white suits. But Open Culture recently turned our attention to a photograph of Sam Clemens taken in 1883. Shirtless Mark Twain has even had a Twitter account since September.

Turns out, Twain is by no means the only author who’s posed topless. From William Faulkner to Ernest Hemingway, here are other writers who’ve gone shirtless.

ALFRED ERISS/TIME LIFE PICTURES/GETTY

William Faulkner

 

AP

Winston Churchill

ALLEN GINSBERG/CORBIA

Allen Ginsberg (left) and Peter Orlovsky

Irwin Allen Ginsberg (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet, philosopher, and writer. He is considered to be one of the leading figures of both the Beat Generation during the 1950s and the counterculture that soon followed. He vigorously opposed militarism, economic materialism and sexual repression and was known as embodying various aspects of this counterculture, such as his views on drugs, hostility to bureaucracy and openness to Eastern religions. He was one of many influential American writers of his time known as the Beat Generation, which included famous writers such as Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. Peter Anton Orlovsky (July 8, 1933 – May 30, 2010) was an American poet and actor. He was the long-time companion of Allen Ginsberg

GETTY

Ernest Hemingway

AP

Eugene O’Neill

BETTMANN/CORBIS

Ezra Pound

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (30 October 1885 – 1 November 1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, as well as a major figure in the early modernist movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision and economy of language. His works include Ripostes (1912), Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (1920) and the unfinished 120-section epic, The Cantos (1917–1969).

TED STRESHINSKY/CORBIS

Ken Kesey and Neal Cassady

HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY Tennessee Williams (center)

 

ALLEN GINSBERG/CORBIS William S. Burroughs
ALLEN GINSBERG/CORBIS William S. Burroughs

(Via The Daily Beast)