18 Hilariously Awkward Haircuts of Vintage Christian Album Covers

The digital music revolution has, for the most part, been great for music fans. But even though listening to music online costs less and gives you access to millions and millions of songs you might not otherwise hear, one thing has sadly been lost in the streaming era: Appreciation for incredible album art.

Sure, we still see tiny thumbnail images of singles and LP album covers displayed next to the song streaming on our iPhones, but it’s just not the same as regularly examining album covers in all of their visual glory. In the world of Christian music, where many artists used the cover to blend spiritual metaphors with airbrushed supernatural entities, inspired outfits and creative font selections, there is truly something that modern music fans are missing.

Here, below is a collection of 18 vintage Vintage album covers that feature artists with the craziest hairdos. Most of them look like they’re from the 1960s but there’s at least one from an ’80s Christian hair band. Hopefully we don’t see a resurgence of these hairstyles, but who knows… your move hipsters!













35 Classic Fast Food Restaurants That No Longer Exist

The places we went and the food we ate as a child have created some of our strongest memories. Who could forget the excitement as a child of heading out to your favorite burger joint or getting treated to some guilty-pleasure fast food? If you haven’t noticed, a lot of once-huge restaurants from the past aren’t around anymore. The places that are around nowadays can’t replace the restaurants we had grown to know and love. Businesses may come and go but the following will never be forgotten. Read on to take a walk down memory lane and rediscover some restaurants that are no longer around.

1. Howard Johnson’s

During the heyday of Howard Johnson’s, sometimes lovingly just referred to as HoJo’s, there were over 1,000 locations nationwide. In fact, it was the largest chain of restaurants during the 1960s and 1970s. The chain of restaurants was known for its iconic buildings, including orange roofs, peaks and weather vanes.

Howard Johnson restaurants quickly started to fall behind its competitors in the fast food business, and its dinner-style restaurants didn’t leave much room for innovation and financial efficiency. “The downfall of Howard Johnson’s was ultimately their competitors. Friendly’s had their ice cream, KFC was all about fried chicken, and in comparison, HoJo’s was just too basic,” one critic stated.

2. Red Barn

The Red Barn restaurant was known for its, well, red barns. The locations looked like barns and the exterior walls were painted red. The design proved popular, seeing as customers could never mistake the Red Barn for any other restaurant in the game.

During the Red Barn’s prime, it had over 400 locations in the US and abroad. There is currently only one location left in Racine, Wisconsin, though its name is now The Farm. Read on to find out what other defunct restaurant chains are no longer around.

3. Beefsteak Charlie’s

Beefsteak Charlie’s was a chain of restaurants that started in Manhattan and grew to fame in the 1910s. They just loved to spoil their customers — maybe a little too much so, seeing as it became one of the reasons they couldn’t pull a profit.

The chain’s slogan was “You’re gonna get spoiled” and that is what they stuck to. The now-defunct restaurant offered all you can eat shrimps and salad, as well as alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and sangria. Unfortunately, all the unlimited booze hit Beefsteak Charlie’s right where they hurt: in the wallet and by 2010, all locations had closed.

4. Lum’s

The family restaurant Lum’s was opened in Miami Beach in 1956 as a hot dog stand then slowly grew. By 1961 they had four locations. They were best known for their beer-steamed hotdogs. Then they rapidly expanded their business.

By the year 1969 Lum’s had over 400 company-owned or franchised restaurants, including in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Europe. The company, however, overextended their reach and ended up filing for bankruptcy. All of the original stores closed by 1982.

5. Minnie Pearl’s Chicken

Minnie Pearl’s Chicken was a line of fast food chicken restaurants established to compete with KFC. The venture was co-founded along with entrepreneur John Jay Hooker and the famous country singer Minnie Pearl allowed them to use her name. Initial estimates calculated huge success in the chicken business.

6. White Tower

Along with the success of White Castle, came imitators. White Castle was founded in 1921, then in 1922 along came White Tower. You might be thinking, “oh, they just have white in the name,” but that wasn’t all they took from White Castle.

The fast food restaurant chain White Tower took just about everything except the kitchen sink. And that was nailed down. No, White Tower took the menu, the style, the advertising methods and even the building architecture. So, pretty much everything. There were 230 locations in the 1950s, but many closed due to legal action against them. The very last location closed in 2004.

7. Isaly’s

Isaly’s was founded way back in the 19th century and they certainly left their mark on American history. Not only was the restaurant known for its chipped chopped ham, it was also famous for inventing the Klondike Bar. Wow!

The name of the restaurants was named after the founder, but in advertisements, it stood for “I Shall Always Love You Sweetheart.” In the later years the company was sold off a few times until it slowly it died out, along with the good ol’ days.

8. Henry’s Hamburgers

Henry’s Hamburgers was opened by an ice cream company to expand on their shakes and malts. Henry’s was modeled after McDonald’s, even though they were a competitor at the time. They offered ten hamburgers for as low as a dollar.

Henry’s Hamburgers was big during the 1960s but started to decline in the 1970s. Their main issue was that they just couldn’t compete with their other fast food competitors. Henry’s didn’t have a drive-in and also didn’t diversify their menu. There is only one location left in Benton Harbor, MI.

9. Horn & Hardart

Horn & Hardart stands out from the rest of the restaurants on this list being that they weren’t just restaurants. They were automated fast food joints, known as “automats”. At this restaurant you could purchase prepared food from behind a glass window, kind of like a giant vending machine.

You just needed to insert the proper amount of coins in the machine and pull a lever to take out the freshly-made food. Sadly the last location closed in 1991. However, similar automat restaurants exist today in other parts of the world, like Europe and Japan.

10. Burger Chef

Burger Chef was a chain of hamburger restaurants founded by General Electric in Indianapolis in 1954. At its peak it had over 1,200 locations nationwide. So what happened to Burger Chef? Well, let’s just say that their biggest competitor was McDonalds…

The fast food chain ended up over expanding in locations and declining in quality, eventually losing out to McDonalds. The chain was then sold off to General Foods and then sold off again. Most of the locations were eventually turned into Hardee’s

You might also like these old photos of people eating ice cream!

Rare Photos of Showing Brutal Life of North Koreans During Winter of 1973

These rare photos of North Korea, were taken in 1973 by British Photographer John Bulmer and published in the British Sunday Times. North Korea was even more isolated during this period than it currently is.

School boys listening to a museum tour guide
School boys listening to a museum tour guide
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
North Koreans staring at foreign reporters
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
A group of tourists in Kim Il Sung Square, 1973.
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
North Koreans pilgrimage to Mansudae Monument
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
A Volga GAZ-21 car stopped at Pyongyang street
Kim IlSung's portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim IlSung’s portrait at Chosun Central Historical Museum
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
Kim Il Sung died in 1994. His statue was created in North Korea in 1973 long before he died.
School children walking along the Pyongyang People's Palace
School children walking along the Pyongyang People’s Palace
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
Cleaner in Pyongyang City
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung's birthplace.
John Boomer and Philip Oaks, photographers, pose in front of Kim Il Sung’s birthplace.
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Posters on North Korean Street, 1973
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
Women viewing poster of Kim Il Sung
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean high school students learning how to disassemble firearms.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean mural showing revolutionary struggle.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
North Korean weekday morning. Residents off to work by foot.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea.
Foreign-only hotel in North Korea. Notice that there are no locals milling about.
Girls in Pyongyang City.
Girls in Pyongyang City.

26 Wild Photos of New Yorks Notorious Studio 54 Disco Club

Studio 54 is a former nightclub and currently a Broadway theatre, located at 254 West 54th Street, between Eighth Avenue and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, originally built as the Gallo Opera House, opened in 1927, after which it changed names several times, eventually becoming CBS radio and television Studio 52.

In the late 1970s, at the peak of the disco dancing and music trend, the building was renamed after its location and became a world-famous nightclub and discotheque.The nightclub founders spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on professional lighting design and kept many of the former TV and theatrical sets, in the process creating a unique dance club that became famous for its celebrity guest lists, restrictive (and subjective) entry policies (based on one’s appearance and style), and open club drug use. Founded and created by Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager in 1977, it was sold in 1980 to Mark Fleischman,[7][8][9] who reopened the club after it had been shut down following the conviction of Rubell and Schrager on charges of tax evasion. In 1984, Fleischman sold the club, which continued to operate until 1986.

Since November 1998, it has served as a venue for productions of the Roundabout Theatre Company and retains the name Studio 54. A separate restaurant and nightclub, Feinstein’s/54 Below, operates in the basement of the building.


















Photos of of Pimps, Prostitutes and Homeless from 1970s Times Square Through a Bartender’s Camera

In 1972 Shelly Nadelman began a ten-year run bartending at one of New York City’s most notorious dives: the Terminal Bar, located across the street from the Port Authority Bus Terminal near Times Square.

For ten years, right up until the bar closed for good in 1982, he shot thousands of black and white photographs, mostly portraits of his customers— neighborhood regulars, drag queens, thrill-seeking tourists, pimps and prostitutes, midtown office workers dropping by before catching a bus home to the suburbs—all of whom found welcome and respite at the Terminal Bar.

“In the beginning it was just the regulars and they were willing and able to be photographed,” Nadelman said in an interview. “Then there were just faces that came in and I knew I wouldn’t see them again. But they looked interesting. I’d say 90 percent of the people were willing to be photographed.”
In the early 2000s, his grown son Stefan began sorting, scanning, and printing his dad’s negatives, and very quickly realized that the scene at Terminal Bar had become a historic artifact. That New York was fading fast — it was just about gone, in fact — and Sheldon Nadelman had caught it all. The images were eventually made into a book, Terminal Bar, by Princeton Architectural Press; it brings back to life the 1970s presanitized Times Square, a raucous chapter of the city that never sleeps.

Rare Colour Pictures of Seoul in 1948-49, before the Korean War

In 1945, with the surrender of the Empire of Japan in September 1945 that ended World War II, Korea was liberated from the Japanese occupation exercised since 1910. However, the peninsula was divided in two parts: the Republic of Korea (South Korea), supported by the United Nations, and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea), at one time supported by the People’s Republic of China and the Soviet Union. A few years later, in 1950, North Korea launched a surprise attack with the intention to invade South Korea and move to dominate the whole peninsula. The attack began the Korean War, a conflict that still exists today, despite the ceasefire signed in 1953.

Here’s a series of 32 awesome colour photographs of daily life in Seoul. These photos are taken in the winter, between October 1948 and March 1949.

 
























































You might find these photos of North Korean in 1980s interesting!

Candid Anthony Bourdain’s Childhood Photos Before He Became the Most Influential Chef in the World




“I have the best job in the world. If I’m unhappy, it’s a failure of imagination.”

Born on June 25, 1956, in New York City and raised in New Jersey, Anthony Bourdain knew he’d be a chef while vacationing on the coast on France with his parents as a boy. A local fisherman offered him an oyster fresh from the sea; he ate it, and “That was it, man,” Bourdain said in an interview. “That was it.”
In 2012, Bourdain wrote an essay about his father for Bon Appétit and shared a collection of his childhood photographs. “My father was, as he liked to say, ‘a man of simple needs.’ He grew up with a French mother, a French name, speaking French, and spent many summers in France. But this history wasn’t really a factor in my childhood. It always came as a shock to me when he’d break into French with a Haitian cabdriver as there was, seemingly, nothing ‘French’ about him, or us, or how we lived.
He taught me early that the value of a dish is the pleasure it brings you; where you are sitting when you eat it—and who you are eating it with—are what really matter. Perhaps the most important life lesson he passed on was: Don’t be a snob. It’s something I will always at least aspire to—something that has allowed me to travel this world and eat all it has to offer without fear or prejudice. To experience joy, my father taught me, one has to leave oneself open to it.”
Bourdain was found dead of an apparent suicide by his friend Éric Ripert on June 8, 2018, in his hotel room in Kaysersberg-Vignoble, France. He was working on an episode of Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown in Strasbourg, France.
CNN confirmed the death of their colleague, while adding, “His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller. His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much.”















(Via vintagees)

Amazing Colorized Photos of discovery of Tutankhamun in 1922

During the early twentieth century, Howard Carter, a British Egyptologist, excavated for many years in the Valley of the Kings—a royal burial ground located on the west bank of the ancient city of Thebes, Egypt. When Carter arrived in Egypt in 1891, he became convinced there was at least one undiscovered tomb–that of the little known Tutankhamen, or King Tut, who lived around 1400 B.C. and died when he was still a teenager. Backed by a rich Brit, Lord Carnarvon, Carter searched for five years without success. In early 1922, Lord Carnarvon wanted to call off the search, but Carter convinced him to hold on one more year.

Finally the wait paid off when Carter came upon the first of twelve steps of the entrance that led to the tomb of Tutankhamun. He quickly recovered the steps and sent a telegram to Carnarvon in England so they could open the tomb together. Carnarvon departed for Egypt immediately and on November 26, 1922, they made a hole in the entrance of the antechamber in order to look in.

Tutankhamun’s burial mask.
Tutankhamun’s burial mask.

 

Chests inside the treasury.
Chests inside the treasury.

Carter recalled: “At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the lights, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold –everywhere the glint of gold”.

When Carter and Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb’s interior chambers on November 26, they were thrilled to find it virtually intact, with its treasures untouched after more than 3,000 years. The men began exploring the four rooms of the tomb, and on February 16, 1923, under the watchful eyes of a number of important officials, Carter opened the door to the last chamber.

Inside lay a sarcophagus with three coffins nested inside one another. The last coffin, made of solid gold, contained the mummified body of King Tut. Among the riches found in the tomb–golden shrines, jewelry, statues, a chariot, weapons, clothing–the perfectly preserved mummy was the most valuable, as it was the first one ever to be discovered.

Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Carter examines Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.
Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas work on a golden chariot from Tutankhamun’s tomb outside the “laboratory” in the tomb of Sethos II.

 

Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus held not one but three coffins in which to hold the body of the king. The outer two coffins were crafted in wood and covered in gold along with many semiprecious stones, such as lapis lazuli and turquoise. The inner coffin, however, was made of solid gold. When Howard Carter first came upon this coffin, it was not the shiny golden image we see in the Egyptian museum today. In his excavation notes, Carter states, it was “covered with a thick black pitch-like layer which extended from the hands down to the ankles. This was obviously an anointing liquid which had been poured over the coffin during the burial ceremony and in great quantity (some two buckets full)”.

 

An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.
An assortment of model boats in the treasury of the tomb.

The tomb was robbed at least twice in antiquity, but based on the items taken (including perishable oils and perfumes) and the evidence of restoration of the tomb after the intrusions, it seems clear that these robberies took place within several months at most of the initial burial.

Eventually, the location of the tomb was lost because it had come to be buried by stone chips from subsequent tombs, either dumped there or washed there by floods. In the years that followed, some huts for workers were built over the tomb entrance, clearly without anyone’s knowing what lay beneath. When at the end of the 20th Dynasty the Valley of the Kings burial sites were systematically dismantled, Tutankhamun’s tomb was overlooked, presumably because knowledge of it had been lost, and his name may have been forgotten.

 

Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.
Ornately carved alabaster vases in the antechamber.

n total 5,398 items were found in the tomb, including a solid gold coffin, face mask, thrones, archery bows, trumpets, a lotus chalice, food, wine, sandals, and fresh linen underwear. Howard Carter took 10 years to catalog the items. Recent analysis suggests a dagger recovered from the tomb had an iron blade made from a meteorite; study of artifacts of the time including other artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb could provide valuable insights into metalworking technologies around the Mediterranean at the time.

For many years, rumors of a “Curse of the Pharaohs” (probably fueled by newspapers seeking sales at the time of the discovery) persisted, emphasizing the early death of some of those who had entered the tomb. A study showed that of the 58 people who were present when the tomb and sarcophagus were opened, only eight died within a dozen years. All the others were still alive, including Howard Carter, who died of lymphoma in 1939 at the age of 64. The last survivor, American archaeologist J.O. Kinnaman, died in 1961, a full 39 years after the event.

 

A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
A statue of Anubis on a shrine with pallbearers’ poles in the treasury of the tomb.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker open the doors of the innermost shrine and get their first look at Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
In a “laboratory” set up in the tomb of Sethos II, conservators Arthur Mace and Alfred Lucas clean one of the sentinel statues from the antechamber.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Under the lion bed in the antechamber are several boxes and chests, and an ebony and ivory chair which Tutankhamun used as a child.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callender and two Egyptian workers carefully dismantle one of the golden shrines within the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Carter, Callende, and two workers remove the partition wall between the antechamber and the burial chamber.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
Howard Carter, Arthur Callender and an Egyptian worker wrap one of the sentinel statues for transport.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
A gilded lion bed and inlaid clothes chest among other objects in the antechamber.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
Inside the outermost shrine in the burial chamber, a huge linen pall with gold rosettes, reminiscent of the night sky, covers the smaller shrines within.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
A gilded bust of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret and chests sit in the treasury of the tomb.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
Carter and a worker examine the solid gold innermost sarcophagus.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
A ceremonial bed in the shape of the Celestial Cow, surrounded by provisions and other objects in the antechamber of the tomb.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.
Lord Carnarvon, financier of the excavation, reads on the veranda of Carter’s house near the Valley of the Kings.

(Via rarehistoricalphotos)(Photo credit: Harry Burton, The Griffith Institute, Oxford. Colorized by Dynamichrome for the exhibition “The Discovery of King Tut” in New York).

Rare Street vendor selling mummies in Egypt, 1865

During the Victorian era of 1800’s, Napoleon’s conquest of Egypt threw open the Gates of Egypt’s history for the Europeans. At that time, mummies were not accorded the respect that they deserved from the European elites and in fact, mummies could be purchased from street vendors (as shown in picture) to be used as the main event for parties and social gatherings that took place in the 18th century. The elites of the era would often hold “Mummy Unwrapping Parties”, which, as the name suggests, had the main theme in which a Mummy would be unwrapped in front of a boisterous audience, cheering and applauding at the same time.

During that period of time, the well-preserved remains of ancient Egyptians were routinely ground into powder and consumed as a medicinal remedy. Indeed, so popular was pulverized mummy that it even instigated a counterfeit trade to meet demand, in which the flesh of beggars was passed off as that of ancient mummified Egyptians.

As the Industrial Revolution progressed, so Egyptian mummies were exploited for more utilitarian purposes: huge numbers of human and animal mummies were ground up and shipped to Britain and Germany for use as fertilizer. Others were used to create mummy brown pigment or were stripped of their wrappings, which were subsequently exported to the US for use in the paper-making industry. The author Mark Twain even reported that mummies were burnt in Egypt as locomotive fuel.

As the nineteenth century advanced, mummies became prized objects of display and scores of them were purchased by wealthy European and American private collectors as tourist souvenirs. For those who could not afford a whole mummy, disarticulated remains – such as a head, hand or foot – could be purchased on the black market and smuggled back home.

So brisk was the trade in mummies to Europe that even after ransacking tombs and catacombs there just were not enough ancient Egyptian bodies to meet the demand. And so fake mummies were fabricated from the corpses of the executed criminals, the aged, the poor and those who had died from hideous diseases, by burying them in the sand or stuffing them with bitumen and exposing them to the sun.

Interesting facts:

  • Mummy brown was originally made in the 16th and 17th centuries from white pitch, myrrh, and the ground-up remains of Egyptian mummies, both human and feline. As it had good transparency, it could be used for glazes, shadows, flesh tones and shading. Artists believed that when bitumen and mummified flesh were used in oil paint it wouldn’t crack or dry. Mummy Brown eventually ceased being produced in its traditional form later in the 20th century when the supply of available mummies was exhausted.
  • Mummia or mummy is either a substance used in the embalming of mummies, or a powder made from ground mummies, used as a “medical preparation”. Ancient Egyptian mummy-making often utilized asphaltum (Persian: mumiya) as an ingredient for filling the empty body cavities once the organs were removed. In the Middle Ages, the resin that had been used on ancient Egyptian mummies was believed to have superior medicinal and chemical value to regular asphaltum, and the resulting demand for the ingredient caused the term to be applied to the dead bodies required to harvest it as much as to the ingredient itself.

(Via rarehistoricalphotosYou might also like: Headless Photos of the Victoria Era

14 Stunning Photos of African Americans in Chicago in the 1970s

From June through October 1973 and briefly during the spring of 1974, John H. White, a 28-year-old photographer with the Chicago Daily News, worked for the federal government photographing Chicago, especially the city`s African American community. White took his photographs for the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) DOCUMERICA project. As White reflected recently, he saw his assignment as “an opportunity to capture a slice of life, to capture history.” His photographs portray the difficult circumstances faced by many of Chicago`s African American residents in the early 1970s, but they also catch the “spirit, love, zeal, pride, and hopes of the community.”

Today, John White is a staff photographer with the Chicago Sun-Times. He has won hundreds of awards, and his work has been exhibited and published widely. In 1982 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.

Sunrise on Lake Michigan with Chicago shown in the background. March 1973.
(National Archives and Records Administration)

 

Black sidewalk salesmen arranging their fresh fruits and vegetables on Chicago’s South Side. June 1973

 

Black products was one of the themes at the annual Black Expo held in Chicago. October 1973
Empty housing in the ghetto on Chicago`s South Side. May 1973
Chicago ghetto on the South Side. May 1973

“Chicago ghetto on the South Side. Although the percentage of Chicago blacks making $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58% between 1960 and 1970, a large percentage still remained unemployed. The black unemployment rate is generally assumed to be twice that of the national unemployment rate published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.”

The captions are John White’s own, written some time after he took his photographs. In some cases White used virtually the same caption for several images.
“Black youths play basketball at Stateway Gardens’ high-rise housing project on Chicago’s South Side. The complex has eight buildings with 1,633 two and three bedroom apartments housing 6,825 persons. They were built under the U.S. Housing Acts of 1949 and 1968. They are managed by the Chicago Housing Authority which is responsible for 41,500 public housing dwellings.”

 

“Black youngsters cool off with fire hydrant water on Chicago’s South Side in the Woodlawn community. The kids don’t go to the city beaches and use the fire hydrants to cool off instead. It’s a tradition in the community, comprised of very low income people. The area has high crime and fire records. From 1960 to 1970 the percentage of Chicago blacks with income of $7,000 or more jumped from 26% to 58%.”
“Young woman soliciting funds for a Chicago organization in a shopping center parking lot. She is one of the nearly 1.2 million black people who make up over a third of the population of Chicago. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. The photos are portraits that reflect pride, love, beauty, hope, struggle, joy, hate, frustration, discontent, worship, and faith. She is a member of her race who is proud of her heritage.”

 

“Minority youngsters who have gathered to have their picture taken on Chicago’s South Side during a talent show. Blacks make up over one third of the 3.6 million population in the city. Chicago census figures for 1970 show a significant gap in economic security between blacks and whites. Only 35% of black families earned $10,000 to $25,000 compared to 60% of white families. Of families earning less than $8,000 a total of 50% were black compared to 21% white.”
“A black man painting a store front on South Wabash Street. One of the nearly 1.2 million people of his race who make up over a third of Chicago’s population. It is one of the many black faces in this project that portray life in all its seasons. In short, they are portraits of human beings who feel they are individuals and are proud of their heritage.” July 1973

 

Religious fervor is mirrored on the face of a Black Muslim woman, one of some 10,000 listening to Elijah Muhammad deliver his annual Savior’s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
`The Fruit of Islam,` a special group of bodyguards for Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad, sits at the bottom of the platform while he delivers his annual Savior`s Day message in Chicago. March 1974
Black bongo player performs at the International Amphitheater in Chicago as part of the annual PUSH [People United to Save Humanity] ‘Black Expo’ in the fall of 1973. October 1973
The Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks on a radio broadcast from the headquarters of Operation PUSH, [People United to Save Humanity] at its annual convention. July 1973
(All photos and text courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)